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Getting By on the Minimum : The Lives of Working-Class Women

By: Johnson, Jennifer.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2013Description: 1 online resource (279 p.).ISBN: 9781135298883.Subject(s): Poor women -- United States -- Case studies | Social classes -- United States -- Case studies | Working class women -- United States -- Case studiesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Getting By on the Minimum: The Lives of Working-Class WomenDDC classification: 305.48/9623/0973 | 305.4896230973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Getting By on the Minimum; Title Page ; Copyright Page ; Table of Contents ; Acknowledgments; Dedication; 1 Introduction; 2 The Meaning of Work and Class; 3 Life on the Job; 4 Can''t Get No Satisfaction; 5 What Work Means; 6 Work (f)or Family; 7 The Work of Caring; 8 Growing Up Poor in Postwar America; 9 Dropping Out; 10 What Will I Be?; 11 Getting By on the Minimum; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1421 .J65 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1562838 Available EBL1562838

Cover; Getting By on the Minimum; Title Page ; Copyright Page ; Table of Contents ; Acknowledgments; Dedication; 1 Introduction; 2 The Meaning of Work and Class; 3 Life on the Job; 4 Can''t Get No Satisfaction; 5 What Work Means; 6 Work (f)or Family; 7 The Work of Caring; 8 Growing Up Poor in Postwar America; 9 Dropping Out; 10 What Will I Be?; 11 Getting By on the Minimum; Notes; Bibliography; Index

First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Johnson (sociology, Johns Hopkins Univ.) here provides a view into the lives of working-class women by presenting the thoughts, feelings, and experiences of 63 women who participated in a work-satisfaction study. Of more significance, she also explores class distinctions among women by including 18 middle- to upper-middle-class women for comparison. Johnson encouraged her subjects to give full voice to their thoughts, and the result is an honest glimpse into their lives. The book follows a style similar to Studs Terkel's Working and Lillian Rubin's Worlds of Pain in that the actual words of the interviewees are used, giving the reader the impression of being directly spoken to. But Johnson's study is especially meaningful because she acknowledges the class distinction among working women and increases readers' awareness of these differences, as well as of all the workplace inequities women face. More in depth and insightful than Barbara Ehrenreich's Nickel and Dimed, the book successfully lays out the complex array of reasons some women work at lower-paying jobs, from their perspective. Well documented and containing an extensive bibliography, this should be required reading for certain sociology and women's studies courses and is recommended for all academic and large public libraries.-Sandra Isaacson, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Johnson details the experiences of working-class women trying to make ends meet, working in low-paying jobs with few benefits, little security, and in unpleasant conditions. These women's efforts at getting by are complicated by family responsibilities and a lack of education that limit their life choices, the two underlying themes of the book. There is much to recommend it. The book uses macrosociological perspectives and various data to place these women's lives into greater context and provide comparative perspective. The jewel of the book, however, is Johnson's use of a microsociological perspective and the extensive use of in-depth interviews. Some parts, especially when the theoretical implications of Johnson's research are detailed, are packed with wonderful sociological insight that nicely pushes the boundaries of the comfortable. Johnson is good at challenging assumptions, debunking myths, and providing insights about subtle barriers that people face in making their places in the world, especially for a group not often considered in academic research. The book's shortcomings are minor: more clarification and more explicit contextualization of some of the interview data would have been helpful; some interpretations of the interview data are loose fitting; and some redundancies in close proximity detract from narrative flow. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels and collections. G. Rundblad Illinois Wesleyan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jennifer Johnson is a Research Scientist in the Department of Sociology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. She is the Co-Principal Investigator of a two-year research project funded by the National Science Foundation.

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