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American Civil Religion : What Americans Hold Sacred

By: Gardella, Peter.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, USA, 2013Description: 1 online resource (385 p.).ISBN: 9780199355013.Subject(s): Collective memory -- United States | National characteristics, American | National monuments -- Social aspects -- United States | Patriotism -- United States | Public history -- United States | Symbolism -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: American Civil Religion : What Americans Hold SacredDDC classification: 200.973 | 973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; American Civil Religion; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1. What Is American Civil Religion?; 2. America: The Name, the Concept, and the Word; 3. Jamestown and Its Anniversaries; 4. The Mayfl ower Compact; 5. Plymouth Rock, the Pilgrims, and the Indians; 6. City on a Hill: From Jesus to Winthrop, Kennedy, and Reagan; 7. The Freedom Trail and Boston Common; 8. The Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, and the Slave Quarters; 9. The Flag; 10. The Declaration of Independence; 11. The Great Seal and the Dollar Bill; 12. The Constitution
13. Washington, D.C.: The City, the Capitol, and the White House14. The Star-Spangled Banner; 15. The Washington Monument; 16. The Battle Hymn of the Republic; 17. Gettysburg and the Gett ysburg Address; 18. Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address; 19. Arlington National Cemetery; 20. The Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island; 21. America the Beautiful; 22. The Lincoln Memorial; 23. Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills; 24. God Bless America; 25. Th is Land Is Your Land; 26. The Four Freedoms; 27. Iwo Jima: The Picture, the Monuments, and the Battle; 28. Disney Parks; 29. The Kennedy Inaugural
30. King's Speeches: The Mall (1963) and Memphis (1968)31. Vietnam Veterans Memorial; 32. Transforming the National Mall; 33. Ground Zero, Martyrdom, and Empire; 34. Conflict, Consensus, and the Future
Summary: The United States has never had an officially established national church. Since the time of the first British colonists, it has instead developed a strong civil religion that melds God and nation. In a deft exploration of American civil religious symbols-from the Liberty Bell to the Vietnam Memorial, from Mount Rushmore to Disney World-Peter Gardella explains how the places, objects, and words that Americans hold sacred came into being and how Americans' feelings about them have changed over time. In addition to examining revered historical sites and structures, he analyzes such sacred texts
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Cover; American Civil Religion; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1. What Is American Civil Religion?; 2. America: The Name, the Concept, and the Word; 3. Jamestown and Its Anniversaries; 4. The Mayfl ower Compact; 5. Plymouth Rock, the Pilgrims, and the Indians; 6. City on a Hill: From Jesus to Winthrop, Kennedy, and Reagan; 7. The Freedom Trail and Boston Common; 8. The Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, and the Slave Quarters; 9. The Flag; 10. The Declaration of Independence; 11. The Great Seal and the Dollar Bill; 12. The Constitution

13. Washington, D.C.: The City, the Capitol, and the White House14. The Star-Spangled Banner; 15. The Washington Monument; 16. The Battle Hymn of the Republic; 17. Gettysburg and the Gett ysburg Address; 18. Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address; 19. Arlington National Cemetery; 20. The Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island; 21. America the Beautiful; 22. The Lincoln Memorial; 23. Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills; 24. God Bless America; 25. Th is Land Is Your Land; 26. The Four Freedoms; 27. Iwo Jima: The Picture, the Monuments, and the Battle; 28. Disney Parks; 29. The Kennedy Inaugural

30. King's Speeches: The Mall (1963) and Memphis (1968)31. Vietnam Veterans Memorial; 32. Transforming the National Mall; 33. Ground Zero, Martyrdom, and Empire; 34. Conflict, Consensus, and the Future

The United States has never had an officially established national church. Since the time of the first British colonists, it has instead developed a strong civil religion that melds God and nation. In a deft exploration of American civil religious symbols-from the Liberty Bell to the Vietnam Memorial, from Mount Rushmore to Disney World-Peter Gardella explains how the places, objects, and words that Americans hold sacred came into being and how Americans' feelings about them have changed over time. In addition to examining revered historical sites and structures, he analyzes such sacred texts

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Interpretations vary widely on the nature of the religious and political elements of American civil religion. Gardella (Manhattanville College) emphasizes the religious dimensions, identifying civil religion as "what Americans hold sacred." In 34 concise chapters he discusses influential American icons, including monuments (Washington Monument, Arlington Cemetery, Lincoln Memorial, Statue of Liberty); documents (Declaration of Independence, Constitution); songs ("The Star Spangled Banner," "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," "God Bless America"); and speeches (Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and Second Inaugural Address, Roosevelt's Four Freedoms, Kennedy's Inaugural Address, and King's speeches). These selections, which represent all centuries of American experience, particularly emphasize American identity in relation to Puritanism, revolution, the Civil War, 20th-century wars abroad, and quests for justice at home. Each chapter provides illuminating discussions of history and current status as well as Gardella's interpretation of the symbolism/sacred meaning of each topic. Gardella sees four values emerging through reflections on these national symbols: personal liberty, political democracy, cultural tolerance, and peace. For him these are American civil religion's sacred concepts. Though these concepts often have been denied in the American experience (e.g., slavery, intolerance of immigrants, wars), they project hope for liberty and justice for all in the future of the US. No index or footnotes. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower- and upper-level undergraduates. W. L. Pitts Jr. Baylor University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Peter Gardella is Professor of World Religions at Manhattanville College. His previous books are Innocent Ecstasy, on sex and religion in America; Domestic Religion, on American attitudes toward everyday life; and American Angels: Useful Spirits in the Material World. He is now working on The World's Religions in New York City: A History and Guide and on Birds in the World's Religions (with Laurence Krute).

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