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Mark Twain : The Complete Interviews

By: Scharnhorst, Gary.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Amer Lit Realism & Naturalism: Publisher: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (736 p.).ISBN: 9780817315764.Subject(s): Authors, American - 19th century | Twain, Mark | Twain, Mark, -- 1835-1910 -- Interviews.Authors, American -- 19th century -- InterviewsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Mark Twain : The Complete InterviewsDDC classification: 813.4 | 818/.409 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Introduction; Abbreviations; 1. The Growth of Mark Twain's Early Reputation, 1871-1884: Interviews 1-20; 2. The "Twins of Genius" Tour, 1884-1885 : Interviews 21-39; 3. The Best and Worst of Times, 1886-1895 : Interviews 40-59; 4. Across North America, 1895 : Interviews 60-81; 5. Across Australia, Asia, and Africa, 1895-1896 : Interviews 82-120; 6. "Ambassador at Large" and Man of Letters, 1897-1901 : Interviews 121-151; 7. Last Visit to Missouri, 1902 : Interviews 152-170; 8. At Large, 1902-1906 : Interviews 171-195; 9. "Dean of Humorists," 1906-1907 : Interviews 196-220
10. Visit to Oxford, 1907 : Interviews 221-23511. The Long Goodbye, 1907-1910 : Interviews 236-258; Appendix; Index
Summary: The great writer's irascible wit shines in this comprehensive collection.   This volume is an annotated and indexed scholarly edition of every known interview with Mark Twain spanning his entire career. In these interviews, Twain discusses such topical issues as his lecture style, his writings, and his bankruptcy, while holding forth on such timeless issues as human nature, politics, war and peace, government corruption, humor, race relations, imperialism, international copyright, the elite, and his impressions of other writers (Howells, Gorky, George Bernard Shaw, T
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS1331 | PS1331.A2 2006 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=454585 Available EBL454585

Contents; Introduction; Abbreviations; 1. The Growth of Mark Twain's Early Reputation, 1871-1884: Interviews 1-20; 2. The "Twins of Genius" Tour, 1884-1885 : Interviews 21-39; 3. The Best and Worst of Times, 1886-1895 : Interviews 40-59; 4. Across North America, 1895 : Interviews 60-81; 5. Across Australia, Asia, and Africa, 1895-1896 : Interviews 82-120; 6. "Ambassador at Large" and Man of Letters, 1897-1901 : Interviews 121-151; 7. Last Visit to Missouri, 1902 : Interviews 152-170; 8. At Large, 1902-1906 : Interviews 171-195; 9. "Dean of Humorists," 1906-1907 : Interviews 196-220

10. Visit to Oxford, 1907 : Interviews 221-23511. The Long Goodbye, 1907-1910 : Interviews 236-258; Appendix; Index

The great writer's irascible wit shines in this comprehensive collection.   This volume is an annotated and indexed scholarly edition of every known interview with Mark Twain spanning his entire career. In these interviews, Twain discusses such topical issues as his lecture style, his writings, and his bankruptcy, while holding forth on such timeless issues as human nature, politics, war and peace, government corruption, humor, race relations, imperialism, international copyright, the elite, and his impressions of other writers (Howells, Gorky, George Bernard Shaw, T

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Each of these 258 relatively brief interviews with the 19th and early 20th century's most familiar American has been artfully introduced and annotated, then placed in its appropriate time category (from the earliest, "The Growth of Mark Twain's Early Reputation, 1871-1884," to "The Long Goodbye, 1907-1910"). Most readers are already familiar with the broad brushstrokes of Mark Twain's life, especially as immortalized in his more popular fiction. These interviews, however, present a totally new facet of the Twain story, unfictionalized and in fascinating detail. And, strangely, although they appeared in a great diversity of American and international newspapers during the long course of his creative adult life, together they have a wonderful continuity. What these sketches lack in conveying Twain's inimitable humor, they make up for in providing telling detail from the writer's real life. This single volume provides enough information to make many, briefer, more focused volumes extraneous. For libraries whose holdings go beyond the basic Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, it provides a basic building block for Twain's adult biography. Highly recommended for all large research libraries. Charles C. Nash, formerly with Cottey Coll., Nevada, MS (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Like Theodore Dreiser: Interviews, ed. by Frederic Rusch and Donald Pizer (CH, Jun'05, 42-5739), this book provides vivid biographical data with an immediacy that brings to life everything from Mark Twain's personal idiosyncrasies and mannerisms to his central ideas on life and literature. An international celebrity and inveterate traveler, Twain reflected on the social and cultural mores of five continents. He responded to questions, often with his inimitable phrasing, about the leading political, financial, and artistic figures of his day. Scharnhorst (Univ. of New Mexico) wisely presents the pieces, which date from 1871 to 1910, in chronological order, regularizing spelling and punctuation. Annotations aid readers lacking a specialist's knowledge of the historical and biographical references in the interviews. In notes, the editor supplements Twain's interview comments with versions published in other journals. This lengthy edition would have profited from more condensation than it in fact received. Because it includes numerous extraordinary interviews, fewer selections that repeat Twain's pat routines (on subjects ranging from his ideas about international copyrights to his smoking habits) would have made the volume as friendly for the general reader as for the scholar. Nevertheless, in small doses the material will delight and enlighten anyone interested in Mark Twain. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, and faculty; general readers. T. P. Riggio University of Connecticut

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled throughout the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, Gilded Age in 1873, which was co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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