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Power to the People : Energy in Europe over the Last Five Centuries

By: Kander, Astrid.
Contributor(s): Malanima, Paolo | Warde, Paul.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.The Princeton Economic History of the Western World: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (473 p.).ISBN: 9781400848881.Subject(s): Energy consumption | Energy industries | Energy policy | Power resourcesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Power to the People : Energy in Europe over the Last Five CenturiesDDC classification: 333.7940973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface; CHAPTER ONE: Introduction; CHAPTER TWO: Definitions and Concepts; PART I: Pre-Industrial Economies; CHAPTER THREE: Traditional Sources; 1. Energy in Premodern Societies; 2. Organic Sources and Agricultures; 3. Non-organic Sources; 4. Seven Long-run Propositions; 5. Conclusion; CHAPTER FOUR: Constraints and Dynamics; 1. Population and Climate; 2. Energy Scarcity; 3. Saving Land; 4. Saving Labor; 5. Conclusion; PART II: The First Industrial Revolution; CHAPTER FIVE: A Modern Energy Regime; 1. The Take-off of Coal
2. Traditional Sources: Rise but Relative Decline3. Conclusion; CHAPTER SIX: The Coal Development Block; 1. The Core Innovations; 2. The Growth Dynamics of the Coal Development Block; 3. The Transport Revolution; CHAPTER SEVEN: Energy and Industrial Growth; 1. Coal and Growth; 2. Seven Long-run Propositions; 3. Energy Intensity and Economic Structure; 4. Conclusion; PART III: The Second and Third Industrial Revolutions; CHAPTER EIGHT: Energy Transitions in the Twentieth Century; 1. The Rise of Oil and Electricity; 2. Old and New in Energy Regimes; 3. Conclusion
CHAPTER NINE: Major Development Blocks in the Twentieth Century and Their Impacts on Energy1. The ICE-Oil Block; 2. The Electricity Block; 3. The ICT Development Block; 4. Conclusion; CHAPTER TEN: The Role of Energy in Twentieth-Century Economic Growth; 1. Development Blocks and GDP; 2. Seven Long-run Propositions; 3. Energy Intensity and Economic Structure; CHAPTER ELEVEN: Summary and Implications for the Future; 1. Summing Up the Book; 2.Thinking about the Future; 3. Some Remarks about the Future; APPENDIXES; A. The Role of Energy in Growth Accounting
B. Decomposing Energy Intensity 1870-1970C. The Impact from the Service Transition on Energy Intensity; D. Biased Technical Development; References; Index
Summary: Power to the People examines the varied but interconnected relationships between energy consumption and economic development in Europe over the last five centuries. It describes how the traditional energy economy of medieval and early modern Europe was marked by stable or falling per capita energy consumption, and how the First Industrial Revolution in the eighteenth century--fueled by coal and steam engines--redrew the economic, social, and geopolitical map of Europe and the world. The Second Industrial Revolution continued this energy expansion and social transformation through the use of
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HD9502.A2 .K384 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1458116 Available EBL1458116

Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface; CHAPTER ONE: Introduction; CHAPTER TWO: Definitions and Concepts; PART I: Pre-Industrial Economies; CHAPTER THREE: Traditional Sources; 1. Energy in Premodern Societies; 2. Organic Sources and Agricultures; 3. Non-organic Sources; 4. Seven Long-run Propositions; 5. Conclusion; CHAPTER FOUR: Constraints and Dynamics; 1. Population and Climate; 2. Energy Scarcity; 3. Saving Land; 4. Saving Labor; 5. Conclusion; PART II: The First Industrial Revolution; CHAPTER FIVE: A Modern Energy Regime; 1. The Take-off of Coal

2. Traditional Sources: Rise but Relative Decline3. Conclusion; CHAPTER SIX: The Coal Development Block; 1. The Core Innovations; 2. The Growth Dynamics of the Coal Development Block; 3. The Transport Revolution; CHAPTER SEVEN: Energy and Industrial Growth; 1. Coal and Growth; 2. Seven Long-run Propositions; 3. Energy Intensity and Economic Structure; 4. Conclusion; PART III: The Second and Third Industrial Revolutions; CHAPTER EIGHT: Energy Transitions in the Twentieth Century; 1. The Rise of Oil and Electricity; 2. Old and New in Energy Regimes; 3. Conclusion

CHAPTER NINE: Major Development Blocks in the Twentieth Century and Their Impacts on Energy1. The ICE-Oil Block; 2. The Electricity Block; 3. The ICT Development Block; 4. Conclusion; CHAPTER TEN: The Role of Energy in Twentieth-Century Economic Growth; 1. Development Blocks and GDP; 2. Seven Long-run Propositions; 3. Energy Intensity and Economic Structure; CHAPTER ELEVEN: Summary and Implications for the Future; 1. Summing Up the Book; 2.Thinking about the Future; 3. Some Remarks about the Future; APPENDIXES; A. The Role of Energy in Growth Accounting

B. Decomposing Energy Intensity 1870-1970C. The Impact from the Service Transition on Energy Intensity; D. Biased Technical Development; References; Index

Power to the People examines the varied but interconnected relationships between energy consumption and economic development in Europe over the last five centuries. It describes how the traditional energy economy of medieval and early modern Europe was marked by stable or falling per capita energy consumption, and how the First Industrial Revolution in the eighteenth century--fueled by coal and steam engines--redrew the economic, social, and geopolitical map of Europe and the world. The Second Industrial Revolution continued this energy expansion and social transformation through the use of

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Since the mid-18th century, European economic output per capita has increased dramatically. This growth has been paralleled by an equally dramatic increase in Europe's use of energy. In this volume, Kander (Lund Univ., Sweden), Malanima (National Research Council, Italy), and Warde (Cambridge Univ., UK) argue that conventional accounts of European economic take-off have understated the importance of energy in economic growth. Building on their participation in a larger effort to construct comparable statistics on historical energy use in Europe, the authors organize their argument around three transitions: the British Industrial Revolution based on the introduction of coal, steam, and iron technologies; a second Industrial Revolution in the late 19th century built on electricity, oil, and internal combustion engines; and a third revolution growing out of the spread of integrated circuits and telecommunications. Employing economic theory and growth accounting to illuminate the linkages between energy use and economic activity and supporting their argument with extensive quantitative evidence, the authors make a compelling case that modern economic growth would have been impossible without the increased energy intensity made possible by exploitation of fossil fuels. This work provides valuable historical perspective on pressing contemporary challenges. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty. J. L. Rosenbloom University of Kansas

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Astrid Kander is professor of economic history at Lund University. Paolo Malanima is director of the Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies at the National Research Council in Italy. Paul Warde is reader in early modern history at the University of East Anglia and research associate at the Centre for History and Economics, Magdalene College, University of Cambridge.

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