How the Other Half Ate : A History of Working-Class Meals at the Turn of the Century

By: Turner, Katherine LeonardMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (218 p.)ISBN: 9780520277588Subject(s): Food habits -- United States -- History -- 19th century | Food habits -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Working class -- United States -- Economic conditions | Working class -- United States -- Social conditions | Working class -- United States -- Social life and customsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: How the Other Half Ate : A History of Working-Class Meals at the Turn of the CenturyDDC classification: 394.1 | 394.12 LOC classification: GT2853 .U5 T87 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; 1 The Problem of Food; 2 Factories, Railroads, and Rotary Eggbeaters: From Farm to Table; 3 Food and Cooking in the City; 4 Between Country and City: Food in Rural Mill Towns and Company Towns; 5 "A Woman's Work Is Never Done": Cooking, Class, and Women's Work; 6 What's for Dinner Tonight?; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; P; R; S; T; U; W
Summary: In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, working-class Americans had eating habits that were distinctly shaped by jobs, families, neighborhoods, and the tools, utilities, and size of their kitchens-along with their cultural heritage. How the Other Half Ate is a deep exploration by historian and lecturer Katherine Turner that delivers an unprecedented and thoroughly researched study of the changing food landscape in American working-class families from industrialization through the 1950s.Relevant to readers across a range of disciplines-history, economics, sociology, urban studies,
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GT2853 .U5 T87 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1574614 Available EBL1574614

Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Acknowledgments; 1 The Problem of Food; 2 Factories, Railroads, and Rotary Eggbeaters: From Farm to Table; 3 Food and Cooking in the City; 4 Between Country and City: Food in Rural Mill Towns and Company Towns; 5 "A Woman's Work Is Never Done": Cooking, Class, and Women's Work; 6 What's for Dinner Tonight?; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; P; R; S; T; U; W

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, working-class Americans had eating habits that were distinctly shaped by jobs, families, neighborhoods, and the tools, utilities, and size of their kitchens-along with their cultural heritage. How the Other Half Ate is a deep exploration by historian and lecturer Katherine Turner that delivers an unprecedented and thoroughly researched study of the changing food landscape in American working-class families from industrialization through the 1950s.Relevant to readers across a range of disciplines-history, economics, sociology, urban studies,

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this concise treatment, Turner examines the variability of working-class eating habits between 1870 and 1930, focusing on what she refers to as the "mundane" aspects of getting food on the table on a budget. As with many studies about the working class of this period, the sources here are often from the reformers' perspective, but Turner handles potential biases in a clear, direct way that will help students understand the standards by which working-class people were judged. The book includes information about the roles culture, technology, and geographic and employment differences played in determining what working-class people ate, how they prepared food, and whether they purchased ready-made food. Most of the examples come from the urban working class, but miners' families and rural industries are also represented. A chapter about the gendered dynamics of cooking draws important conclusions about the challenges specific to working-class women. The contribution here is in highlighting specific examples of working-class food habits in a very accessible way. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. M. E. Birk University of Texas Pan American

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Katherine Leonard Turner received her doctorate in history from the University of Delaware in 2008. She lives and teaches in the Philadelphia area.

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