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Assimilating Seoul : Japanese Rule and the Politics of Public Space in Colonial Korea, 1910-1945

By: Henry, Todd A.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (320 p.).ISBN: 9780520958418.Subject(s): Japanese -- Korea (South) -- Seoul -- History -- 20th century | Korea -- History -- Japanese occupation, 1910-1945 | Koreans -- Cultural assimilation -- Korea (South) -- Seoul -- History -- 20th century | Public spaces -- Social aspects -- Korea (South) -- Seoul -- History -- 20th century | Seoul (Korea) -- Ethnic relations -- History -- 20th century | Seoul (Korea) -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Assimilating Seoul : Japanese Rule and the Politics of Public Space in Colonial Korea, 1910–1945DDC classification: 951.95 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Note on Place Names; Preface and Acknowledgments; Introduction. Assimilation and Space: Toward an Ethnography of Japanese Rule; 1. Constructing Keijō: The Uneven Spaces of a Colonial Capital; 2. Spiritual Assimilation: Namsan's Shintō Shrines and Their Festival Celebrations; 3. Material Assimilation: Colonial Expositions on the Kyŏngbok Palace Grounds; 4. Civic Assimilation: Sanitary Life in Neighborhood Keijō; 5. Imperial Subjectification: The Collapsing Spaces of a Wartime City
Epilogue. After Empire's Demise: The Postcolonial Remaking of Seoul's Public SpacesNotes; Selected Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: Assimilating Seoul, the first book-length study written in English about Seoul during the colonial period, challenges conventional nationalist paradigms by revealing the intersection of Korean and Japanese history in this important capital. Through microhistories of Shinto festivals, industrial expositions, and sanitation campaigns, Todd A. Henry offers a transnational account that treats the city's public spaces as ""contact zones,"" showing how residents negotiated pressures to become loyal, industrious, and hygienic subjects of the Japanese empire. Unlike previous, top-down analyses, this e
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS925.S457 .H46 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1596987 Available EBL1596987

Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Note on Place Names; Preface and Acknowledgments; Introduction. Assimilation and Space: Toward an Ethnography of Japanese Rule; 1. Constructing Keijō: The Uneven Spaces of a Colonial Capital; 2. Spiritual Assimilation: Namsan's Shintō Shrines and Their Festival Celebrations; 3. Material Assimilation: Colonial Expositions on the Kyŏngbok Palace Grounds; 4. Civic Assimilation: Sanitary Life in Neighborhood Keijō; 5. Imperial Subjectification: The Collapsing Spaces of a Wartime City

Epilogue. After Empire's Demise: The Postcolonial Remaking of Seoul's Public SpacesNotes; Selected Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

Assimilating Seoul, the first book-length study written in English about Seoul during the colonial period, challenges conventional nationalist paradigms by revealing the intersection of Korean and Japanese history in this important capital. Through microhistories of Shinto festivals, industrial expositions, and sanitation campaigns, Todd A. Henry offers a transnational account that treats the city's public spaces as ""contact zones,"" showing how residents negotiated pressures to become loyal, industrious, and hygienic subjects of the Japanese empire. Unlike previous, top-down analyses, this e

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Seoul, the capital city of Korea, was called Keij when the Korean peninsula was a Japanese colony (1910-45), and is the lens through which Henry (Univ. of California, San Diego) analyzes Japanese colonial governmental policies. He does this by pursuing a broad range of topics connected to public and private spaces in Keij, from the seemingly basic redesign of city streets to complex efforts by the colonial government to assimilate Koreans spiritually (ordering visits to Shinto shrines and distributing Shinto amulets to households), civically (promoting Japanese hygienic values), and materially (enjoining Koreans to visit exhibitions that promote scientific and technological progress, and thus capital production). Henry does an excellent job of highlighting counterintuitive moments. This is not a simple story of a colonial government oppressing the populace from above, but a mix of reactions from both Koreans and expatriate Japanese of lower and elite classes, sometimes acting in unexpected ways. This first deep study of colonial Seoul builds on scholarship on Korean colonialism as well as the Japanese imperial period more generally. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. J. Wert Marquette University

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