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For the family? : how class and gender shape women's work / Sarah Damaske.

By: Damaske, Sarah.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, c2011Description: xiii, 228 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780199791507 (hardback : acid-free paper); 0199791503 (hardback : acid-free paper); 9780199791491 (paperback : acid-free paper); 019979149X (paperback : acid-free paper).Subject(s): Women -- Employment -- Economic aspects -- United States | Social classes -- Economic aspects -- United States | Women -- United States -- Economic conditions | Women -- United States -- Social conditions | Work and family -- United StatesDDC classification: 331.40973
Contents:
The need and choice myths -- The shape of women's work pathways -- A "major career woman" : how women develop early expectations about work -- Working steadily : good work and family support across classes -- Pulling back : divergent routes to similar pathways -- A life interrupted : cumulative disadvantages disrupt plans -- For the family : how women account for work decisions -- Having it all : egalitarian dreams deferred.
Summary: In the contentious debate about women and work, conventional wisdom holds that middle-class women can decide if they work, while working-class women need to work. Yet, even after the recent economic crisis, middle-class women are more likely to work than working-class women. Damaske deflates the myth that financial needs dictate if women work, revealing that financial resources make it easier for women to remain at work and not easier to leave it.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HD6095 .D36 2011 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002203859

Includes bibliographical references (p. [201]-213) and index.

The need and choice myths -- The shape of women's work pathways -- A "major career woman" : how women develop early expectations about work -- Working steadily : good work and family support across classes -- Pulling back : divergent routes to similar pathways -- A life interrupted : cumulative disadvantages disrupt plans -- For the family : how women account for work decisions -- Having it all : egalitarian dreams deferred.

In the contentious debate about women and work, conventional wisdom holds that middle-class women can decide if they work, while working-class women need to work. Yet, even after the recent economic crisis, middle-class women are more likely to work than working-class women. Damaske deflates the myth that financial needs dictate if women work, revealing that financial resources make it easier for women to remain at work and not easier to leave it.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The established view on female labor force participation is that only poor women work to supplement their husband's income. The usual perception is that white middle-class women can choose whether or not to work, while lower-class women and women of color have no choice but to work. A refreshingly different and novel argument is put forth by Damaske (Pennsylvania State Univ.), who argues that this premise on women's labor force participation fails to explain why in the year 2009, women with higher education had substantially higher labor force participation rates than less educated and poorer women. Damaske hypothesizes that women's labor force decisions are influenced as much by their own education, class, and racial background as by family needs. Resulting from in-depth interviews of 80 women, the book discusses complex patterns of personal human capital, taste, and preference on the one hand and familial pressure on the other that drive women's labor force participation in the contemporary US. This pathbreaking book is valuable reading for students of labor economics, sociology, and gender studies, as well as faculty, policy makers, and related professionals. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Students, upper-division undergraduate and up; faculty and researchers; professionals; general readers. S. Chaudhuri University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sarah Damaske is a postdoctoral fellow in the Sociology Department at Rice University.

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