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Children of the prison boom : mass incarceration and the future of American inequality / Sara Wakefield, Christopher Wildeman.

By: Wakefield, Sara [author.].
Contributor(s): Wildeman, Christopher James, 1979- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Studies in crime and public policy: Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, [2014]Description: xiv, 231 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780199989225 (hc : alk. paper); 0199989222 (hc : alk. paper).Subject(s): Children of prisoners -- United States -- Social conditions | Corrections -- Social aspects -- United States | Imprisonment -- United States | Equality -- United StatesDDC classification: 362.82/950973
Contents:
Introduction -- The social patterning of parental imprisonment -- Before and after imprisonment -- Paternal incarceration and mental health and behavioral problems -- Paternal incarceration and infant mortality -- Parental incarceration and child homelessness -- Mass imprisonment and childhood inequality -- Conclusion.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HV8886.U5 W35 2014 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002205219

Includes bibliographical references (pages 201-222) and index.

Introduction -- The social patterning of parental imprisonment -- Before and after imprisonment -- Paternal incarceration and mental health and behavioral problems -- Paternal incarceration and infant mortality -- Parental incarceration and child homelessness -- Mass imprisonment and childhood inequality -- Conclusion.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Wakefield (criminal justice, Rutgers) and Wildeman (sociology, Yale) tested the hypothesis that the incarceration of parents worsens inequality, especially for the children of incarcerated black fathers. This is an original contribution to criminology in which the effects of inequality on chances of ending up in prison have been established, but without enough research on how the incarceration of parents deepens childhood inequality. Using the biographies of Michael and Nathaniel, whose fathers were in prison and who were raised by single mothers in similar communities full of drugs and violence, the authors explain the different outcomes for Nathaniel, who grew up to follow his father to prison, and Michael, who went on to obtain a master's degree before being elected as the youngest member on his city council. The book presents empirical analysis of existing databases and concludes that the costs of mass incarceration outweigh the supposed benefits of reducing crime and protecting children from disruptive parents. Given the analysis, the authors should have taken a position on the campaign against the war on drugs as a major cause of both mass incarceration and mass violence in the communities to which incarcerated parents return with frequent recidivism. Summing Up: Recommended. Undergraduate to faculty and professional libraries. B. Agozino Virgina Tech

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sara Wakefield is Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University.Christopher Wildeman is Associate Professor of Sociology at Yale University.

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