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Voice and equality : civic voluntarism in American politics / Sidney Verba, Kay Lehman Schlozman, Henry E. Brady.

By: Verba, Sidney.
Contributor(s): Schlozman, Kay Lehman, 1946- | Brady, Henry E.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 1995Description: xix, 640 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0674942922 (alk. paper); 9780674942929 (alk. paper); 0674942930 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780674942936 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Political participation -- United States | Political activists -- United States | Voluntarism -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Voice and equality.LOC classification: JK1764 | .V475 1995
Contents:
Part I: The World of Participation -- Part II: Participation and Representation -- Part III: The Civic Voluntarism Model -- Part IV: Participation, Representation, and Denocracy.
Summary: This book confirms Alexis de Tocqueville's idea, dating back a century and a half, that American democracy is rooted in civil society. Citizens' involvement in family, school, work, voluntary associations, and religion has a significant impact on their participation as voters, campaigners, donors, community activists, and protesters. The authors focus on the central issues of involvement: how people come to be active and the issues they raise when they do. They find fascinating differences along cultural lines, among African-Americans, Latinos, and Anglo-Whites, as well as between the religiously observant and the secular. They observe family activism moving from generation to generation, and they look into the special role of issues that elicit involvement, including abortion rights and social welfare.Summary: This far-reaching analysis, based on an original survey of 15,000 individuals, including 2,500 long personal interviews, shows that some individuals have a greater voice in politics than others, and that this inequality results not just from varying inclinations toward activity, but also from unequal access to vital resources such as education. Citizens' voices are especially unequal when participation depends on contributions of money rather than contributions of time. This deeply researched study brilliantly illuminates the many facets of civic consciousness and action and confirms their quintessential role in American democracy.
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Book University of Texas At Tyler
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JK1764 .V475 1995 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002208791

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Part I: The World of Participation -- Part II: Participation and Representation -- Part III: The Civic Voluntarism Model -- Part IV: Participation, Representation, and Denocracy.

This book confirms Alexis de Tocqueville's idea, dating back a century and a half, that American democracy is rooted in civil society. Citizens' involvement in family, school, work, voluntary associations, and religion has a significant impact on their participation as voters, campaigners, donors, community activists, and protesters. The authors focus on the central issues of involvement: how people come to be active and the issues they raise when they do. They find fascinating differences along cultural lines, among African-Americans, Latinos, and Anglo-Whites, as well as between the religiously observant and the secular. They observe family activism moving from generation to generation, and they look into the special role of issues that elicit involvement, including abortion rights and social welfare.

This far-reaching analysis, based on an original survey of 15,000 individuals, including 2,500 long personal interviews, shows that some individuals have a greater voice in politics than others, and that this inequality results not just from varying inclinations toward activity, but also from unequal access to vital resources such as education. Citizens' voices are especially unequal when participation depends on contributions of money rather than contributions of time. This deeply researched study brilliantly illuminates the many facets of civic consciousness and action and confirms their quintessential role in American democracy.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is a pathbreaking, critical examination of political participation in the US. Working from a wide-ranging survey of 15,000 individuals, augmented by 2,500 extended personal interviews, the authors consider forms and rates of political participation as well as the resources necessary to engage in political activity in this country. Their analysis leads to the construction of a "Civic Voluntarism Model" in which specific resources, including time, money, and civic skills, are necessary for participation. Civic skills accrue through involvement with basic institutions, such as schools, voluntary associations, churches, and synagogues. Although money and time are distributed differentially across the population, civic associations allow for some mobility in terms of political involvement. Nevertheless, the patterns of political participation sketched here suggest that the public's voice, although often loud and sometimes clear, is rarely equal. Highest recommendation. General; upper-division undergraduate through faculty. D. R. Imig; University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sidney Verba was born in Brooklyn, New York on May 26, 1932. He received a bachelor's degree in history and literature from Harvard University and a master's degree and doctorate in politics from Princeton University. He was an assistant and associate professor at Princeton and a full professor at Stanford University and the University of Chicago before returning to Harvard in 1973. He taught at Harvard for more than 30 years before retiring in 2007. He was also the director of the Harvard University Library from 1984 to 2007. <p> He co-wrote several books including The Civic Culture: Political Attitudes and Democracy in Five Nations written with Gabriel A. Almond; The Changing American Voter written with Norman Nie and John Petrocik; Participation and Political Equality: A Seven Nation Comparison written with Norman Nie and Jae-on Kim; Designing Social Inquiry: Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research written with Gary King and Robert Keohane; and Voice and Equality: Civic Voluntarism in American Democracy written with Kay Lehman Schlozman and Henry E. Brady. Verba died on March 4, 2019 at the age of 86. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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