Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Managing The Unknown : Essays on Environmental Ignorance

By: UekA¶tter, Frank.
Contributor(s): LA¼bken, Uwe.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Environment in History: International Perspectives: Publisher: New York, NY : Berghahn Books, 2014Description: 1 online resource (208 p.).ISBN: 9781782382539.Subject(s): Environmental ignorance | Environmental management | Environmental policyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Managing The Unknown : Essays on Environmental IgnoranceDDC classification: 333.7 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Contributors; Selected Bibliography; Index
Summary: Information is crucial when it comes to the management of resources. But what if knowledge is incomplete, or biased, or otherwise deficient? How did people define patterns of proper use in the absence of cognitive certainty? Discussing this challenge for a diverse set of resources from fish to rubber, these essays show that deficient knowledge is a far more pervasive challenge in resource history than conventional readings suggest. Furthermore, environmental ignorance does not inevitably shrink with the march of scientific progress: these essays suggest more of a dialectical relationship betw
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
GE170 .M364 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1375281 Available EBL1375281

Contents; Acknowledgments; Contributors; Selected Bibliography; Index

Information is crucial when it comes to the management of resources. But what if knowledge is incomplete, or biased, or otherwise deficient? How did people define patterns of proper use in the absence of cognitive certainty? Discussing this challenge for a diverse set of resources from fish to rubber, these essays show that deficient knowledge is a far more pervasive challenge in resource history than conventional readings suggest. Furthermore, environmental ignorance does not inevitably shrink with the march of scientific progress: these essays suggest more of a dialectical relationship betw

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The essays in Managing the Unknown are historical, but they also indicate how current situations will be handled--poorly. The authors of the eight chapters discuss the US attempt to establish guayule as a rubber source, the use of nitrogen without understanding the nitrogen cycle, exploitation of Canadian forests, conservation in Palestine, Nazi Germany's attempt to increase fishing, predicting the world's petroleum reserves, agriculture in Europe, and whether to use nuclear power in Germany. There are two repeated lessons. First, some ignorance is because of what people do not know, but, unfortunately, some is because previously obtained scientific conclusions were ignored or were not rediscovered until too late. The other lesson is that all too often, natural resources have been seen as inexhaustible. That was true in cases of Canadian forests, of fish stocks, of agricultural soil, of petroleum, and of the environment's ability to withstand extra nitrogen. The last chapter describes how a careful examination of a controversial issue by people with different views led to at least some agreement. Unfortunately, that consensus was not followed by those in power. This thought-provoking work, with a good scholarly apparatus, should be available to readers studying environmental management. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic and professional libraries. --Martin LaBar, Southern Wesleyan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Frank Uekötter is Reader at the School of History and Cultures of the University of Birmingham. His publications include The Age of Smoke. Environmental Policy in Germany and the United States, 1880-1970 (2009), The Green and the Brown. A History of Conservation in Nazi Germany (2006) and, as editor, The Turning Points of Environmental History (2010). He is currently working on a global resource history.</p>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.