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A Savage Conflict : The Decisive Role of Guerrillas in the American Civil War

By: Sutherland, Daniel E.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (454 p.).ISBN: 9780807888674.Subject(s): Guerrilla warfare - Confederate States of America | Guerrilla warfare - United States - History - 19th century | Guerrilla warfare --Confederate States of America | Guerrilla warfare --United States --History --19th century | Guerrillas - Confederate States of America | Guerrillas - United States - History - 19th century | Guerrillas --Confederate States of America | Guerrillas --United States --History --19th century | United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Underground movements | United States --History --Civil War, 1861-1865 --Underground movementsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Savage Conflict : The Decisive Role of Guerrillas in the American Civil WarDDC classification: 973.7/3013 | 973.73013 LOC classification: E470.S89 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Prologue: Baltimore; Part I: Beginnings: (Spring-Summer 1861); Part II: Rules of the Game: (Fall 1861-Summer 1862); Part III: Democracy Run Amok: (Fall 1862-Summer 1863); Part IV: Day of the Outlaw: (Fall 1863-1864); Epilogue: 1865; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The American Civil War is famous for epic battles involving massive armies outfitted in blue and gray uniforms, details that characterize conventional warfare. <i>A Savage Conflict</i> is the first work to treat guerrilla warfare as critical to understanding the course and outcome of the Civil War. Daniel Sutherland argues that irregular warfare took a large toll on the Confederate war effort by weakening support for state and national governments and diminishing the trust citizens had in their officials to protect them.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E470.S89 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=475208 Available EBL475208

Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Prologue: Baltimore; Part I: Beginnings: (Spring-Summer 1861); Part II: Rules of the Game: (Fall 1861-Summer 1862); Part III: Democracy Run Amok: (Fall 1862-Summer 1863); Part IV: Day of the Outlaw: (Fall 1863-1864); Epilogue: 1865; Notes; Bibliography; Index

The American Civil War is famous for epic battles involving massive armies outfitted in blue and gray uniforms, details that characterize conventional warfare. <i>A Savage Conflict</i> is the first work to treat guerrilla warfare as critical to understanding the course and outcome of the Civil War. Daniel Sutherland argues that irregular warfare took a large toll on the Confederate war effort by weakening support for state and national governments and diminishing the trust citizens had in their officials to protect them.

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

This book is a narrative account of guerrilla fighting during the Civil War. The author believes that an understanding of this aspect of the conflict, often regarded as a sideshow, is actually critical to understanding the war's course and outcome. Sutherland (Univ. of Arkansas) argues that guerrilla operations, especially as conducted by the South, helped decide the outcome of the war, although not in ways envisioned by the Confederates. Once thought vital to victory for the South, guerrillas actually proved a liability and a significant factor in the demise of the Lost Cause. Confederate leaders could never decide how to effectively use their guerrilla bands to help win the war. These irregular troops also became increasingly more independent and uncontrollable. Often they ended up waging their own war and preying on loyal Confederates, causing a severe backlash throughout Dixie. This weakened the Confederacy as its citizens ultimately lost faith in the ability of their government to protect them. Sutherland places the "Gray Ghost," John Singleton Mosby; John Hunt Morgan; "Bloody Bill" Anderson; bushwhackers; Red Legs; and jayhawkers, among many others, in the larger context of the "irrepressible conflict" in this wide-ranging account. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels and libraries. E. M. Thomas Gordon College

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