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Catastrophe 1914 : Europe goes to war / Max Hastings.

By: Hastings, Max.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2013Edition: First American edition.Description: xxxvii, 628 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780307597052 (hardback); 0307597059 (hardback); 9780307743831 (pbk.); 0307743837 (pbk.).Subject(s): World War (1914-1918) | World War, 1914-1918 -- Causes | Europe -- History -- July Crisis, 1914Online resources: Cover image
Contents:
1914 chronology -- The organisation of armies in 1914 -- Prologue : Sarajevo -- 'A feeling that events are in the air': Change and decay ; Battle plans -- The descent to war: The Austrians threaten ; The Russians react ; The Germans march ; The British decide -- 'The superb spectacle of the world bursting into flames': Migrations ; Passions ; Departures -- Disaster on the Drina -- Death with flags and trumpets: The execution of Plan XVII ; 'German beastliness' ; Lanrezac encounters Schlieffen -- The British fight: Mons ; Le Cateau, 'Where the fun comes in, I don't know' -- The retreat -- Tannenberg : 'Alas, how many thousands lie there bleeding!' -- The hour of Joffre: Paris at bay ; Sir John despairs ; Seeds of hope -- The nemesis of Moltke: The Marne ; 'Stalemate in our favour' -- 'Poor devils, they fought their ships like men' -- Three armies in Poland -- 'Did you ever dance with him?': Home fronts ; News and abuse -- Open country, open sky: Churchill's adventure ; 'Inventions of the devil' -- Ypres : 'Something that was completely hopeless' -- 'War becomes the scourge of mankind': Poland ; The Serbs' last triumph -- Mudlife -- Silent night, holy night.
Summary: "From the acclaimed military historian, a new history of the outbreak of World War I: from the breakdown of diplomacy to the dramatic battles that occurred before the war bogged down in the trenches. World War I immediately evokes images of the trenches: grinding, halting battles that sacrificed millions of lives for no territory or visible gain. Yet the first months of the war, from the German invasion of Belgium to the Marne to Ypres, were utterly different, full of advances and retreats, tactical maneuvering, and significant gains and losses. In Catastrophe 1914, Max Hastings re-creates this dramatic year, from the diplomatic crisis to the fighting in Belgium and France on the Western front, and Serbia and Galicia to the east. He gives vivid accounts of the battles and frank assessments of generals and political leaders, and shows why it was inevitable that this first war among modern industrial nations could not produce a decisive victory, making a war of attrition inevitable. Throughout we encounter high officials and average soldiers, as well as civilians on the homefront, giving us a vivid portrait of how a continent became embroiled in a war that would change everything"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D511 .H37 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002208825
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
D511 .C54 2013 The sleepwalkers : D511 .C623 1988 The Coming of the First World War / D511 .G32613 1974 July 1914; D511 .H37 2013 Catastrophe 1914 : D511 .L19 1997 The long fuse : D511 .M257 2013 The war that ended peace : D511 .R325 1995 The origins of World War I, 1871-1914 /

Includes bibliographical references (pages 595-603) and index.

"From the acclaimed military historian, a new history of the outbreak of World War I: from the breakdown of diplomacy to the dramatic battles that occurred before the war bogged down in the trenches. World War I immediately evokes images of the trenches: grinding, halting battles that sacrificed millions of lives for no territory or visible gain. Yet the first months of the war, from the German invasion of Belgium to the Marne to Ypres, were utterly different, full of advances and retreats, tactical maneuvering, and significant gains and losses. In Catastrophe 1914, Max Hastings re-creates this dramatic year, from the diplomatic crisis to the fighting in Belgium and France on the Western front, and Serbia and Galicia to the east. He gives vivid accounts of the battles and frank assessments of generals and political leaders, and shows why it was inevitable that this first war among modern industrial nations could not produce a decisive victory, making a war of attrition inevitable. Throughout we encounter high officials and average soldiers, as well as civilians on the homefront, giving us a vivid portrait of how a continent became embroiled in a war that would change everything"-- Provided by publisher.

1914 chronology -- The organisation of armies in 1914 -- Prologue : Sarajevo -- 'A feeling that events are in the air': Change and decay ; Battle plans -- The descent to war: The Austrians threaten ; The Russians react ; The Germans march ; The British decide -- 'The superb spectacle of the world bursting into flames': Migrations ; Passions ; Departures -- Disaster on the Drina -- Death with flags and trumpets: The execution of Plan XVII ; 'German beastliness' ; Lanrezac encounters Schlieffen -- The British fight: Mons ; Le Cateau, 'Where the fun comes in, I don't know' -- The retreat -- Tannenberg : 'Alas, how many thousands lie there bleeding!' -- The hour of Joffre: Paris at bay ; Sir John despairs ; Seeds of hope -- The nemesis of Moltke: The Marne ; 'Stalemate in our favour' -- 'Poor devils, they fought their ships like men' -- Three armies in Poland -- 'Did you ever dance with him?': Home fronts ; News and abuse -- Open country, open sky: Churchill's adventure ; 'Inventions of the devil' -- Ypres : 'Something that was completely hopeless' -- 'War becomes the scourge of mankind': Poland ; The Serbs' last triumph -- Mudlife -- Silent night, holy night.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Hastings (Inferno: The World at War, 1939-1945) turns his hand to the run-up to and first battles of World War I. A theme throughout is the German and Austro-Hungarian brutality and moral culpability for many of the war's horrors while the Allies' political and military leadership was incompetent. Acknowledging that history has never come to a consensus about blame for the catastrophe, Hastings clearly sympathizes with the Allies and the soldiers and civilians who suffered the terrible decisions of their leaders. The Austrians, in their war against Serbia and Russia, combined the brutality of the Germans with the incompetence of the Allies. Hastings clearly describes the political background to hostilities without getting bogged down in the minutiae of Balkan politics. While he spends a good while describing the Eastern political situation, his battlefield focus lies on the western front. His descriptions of the battles that led to three years of trench warfare emphasize how military expertise did not keep pace with military technology at the turn of the century. VERDICT Hastings makes a very complicated story understandable in a way that few serious history books manage. An ideal entry into World War I history for general readers.-Michael Farrell, Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando, FL (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Hastings, British historian of numerous books about world war and conflict, has contributed a significant volume to the debate about the entry of Europe into WW I in 1914. He effectively combines three chapters on the development of nations' responsibility arguments with further detail on military battles, civilian suffering, trench warfare, and the status of the eastern and western fronts by the end of 1914. Regarding war responsibility, Hastings differs from Christopher Clark by coming down hard on German and Austro-Hungarian diplomacy and planning post-Sarajevo. He seems more likely to agree with Fritz Fischer that German planning for western front glory via the Schlieffen Plan was more significant than the Russian mobilization that eventually drew France and Britain into the war. Hastings goes further than most historians with his inclusion of letters and diaries of common soldiers and government officials. Hindenburg, Ludendorff, Moltke, and Falkenhayn are shown to be short of the mark in terms of plans versus actions. French, Asquith, Churchill, and others in the British camp suffer. Joffre, with the exception of the Battle of the Marne, is not spared complaint. For diplomatic and military historians of the period. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. A. M. Mayer College of Staten Island

Author notes provided by Syndetics

British journalist, editor, and historian Max Hastings was born on December 28, 1945. He was a foreign correspondent for BBC television and London's Evening Standard, for which he later served as editor from 1996 to 2001. Hastings also worked as editor and editor-in-chief of The Daily Telegraph. <p> In addition to presenting BBC historical documentaries and writing numerous books of military history, Hastings has contributed to publications including the Daily Mail, The Guardian, and the New York Review of Books. He received the nonfiction Somerset Maugham Award for Bomber Command, as well as the Yorkshire Post Book of the Year Prize for both Overlord and The Battle for the Falklands. His title Catastrophe 1914: Europe Goes to War made The New York Times Best Seller List in 2013. The Secret War: Spies, Ciphers, and Guerrillas, 1939-1945 was published in 2016 and is also on the New York Times Bestsellers List. <p> Hastings was knighted in 2002, is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and from 2002-2007 was President of the Campaign to Protect Rural England. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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