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The sleepwalkers : how Europe went to war in 1914 / Christopher Clark.

By: Clark, Christopher M.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Harper Perennial , 2014Edition: First U.S. edition.Description: xxxi, 697 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780061146657; 006114665X.Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- Causes | World War, 1914-1918 -- Diplomatic history | Europe -- Politics and government -- 1871-1918
Contents:
pt. I. Roads to Sarajevo. I. Serbian ghosts : Murder in Belgrade ; 'Irresponsible elements' ; Mental maps ; Separation ; Escalation ; Three Turkish wars ; The conspiracy ; Nikola Pašić reacts -- The empire without qualities : Conflict and equilibrium ; The chess players ; Lies and forgeries ; Deceptive calm ; Hawks and doves -- pt. II. One continent divided. The polarization of Europe, 1887-1907 : Dangerous liaison: the Franco-Russian alliance ; The judgment of Paris ; The end of British neutrality ; Belated empire: Germany ; The great turning point? ; Painting the devil on the wall -- The many voices of European foreign policy : Sovereign decision-makers ; Who governed in St. Petersburg? ; Who governed in Paris? ; Who governed in Berlin? ; The troubled supremacy of Sir Edward Grey ; The Agadir Crisis of 1911 ; Soldiers and civilians ; The press and public opinion ; The fluidity of power -- Balkan entanglements : Air strikes on Libya ; Balkan helter-skelter ; The wobbler ; The Balkan Winter Crisis of 1912-13 ; Bulgaria or Serbia? ; Austria's troubles ; The Balkanization of the Franco-Russian alliance ; Paris forces the pace ; Poincaré under pressure -- Last chances: détente and danger, 1912-1914 :The limits of détente ; 'Now or never' ; Germans on the Bosphorus ; The Balkan inception scenario ; A crisis of masculinity? ; How open was the future? -- pt. III. Crisis. Murder in Sarajevo :The assassination ; Flashbulb moments ; The investigation begins ; Serbian responses ; What is to be done? -- The widening circle : Reactions abroad ; Count Hoyos goes to Berlin ; The road to the Austrian ultimatum ; The strange death of Nikolai Hartwig -- The French in St Petersburg : Count de Robien changes trains ; M. Poincaré sails to Russia ; The poker game -- The ultimatum : Austria demands ; Serbia responds ; A 'local war' begins -- Warning shots : Firmness prevails ; 'It's war this time' ; Russian reasons -- Last days : A strange light falls upon the map of Europe ; Poincaré returns to Paris ; Russia mobilizes ; The leap into the dark ; 'There must be some misunderstanding' ; The tribulations of Paul Cambon.
Summary: An authoritative chronicle, drawing on new research on World War I, traces the paths to war in a minute-by-minute narrative that examines the decades of history that informed the events of 1914.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D511 .C54 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002208908

"First published in Great Britain in 2012 by Allen Lane, an imprint of Penguin Books"--Title page verso.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 563-666) and index.

pt. I. Roads to Sarajevo. I. Serbian ghosts : Murder in Belgrade ; 'Irresponsible elements' ; Mental maps ; Separation ; Escalation ; Three Turkish wars ; The conspiracy ; Nikola Pašić reacts -- The empire without qualities : Conflict and equilibrium ; The chess players ; Lies and forgeries ; Deceptive calm ; Hawks and doves -- pt. II. One continent divided. The polarization of Europe, 1887-1907 : Dangerous liaison: the Franco-Russian alliance ; The judgment of Paris ; The end of British neutrality ; Belated empire: Germany ; The great turning point? ; Painting the devil on the wall -- The many voices of European foreign policy : Sovereign decision-makers ; Who governed in St. Petersburg? ; Who governed in Paris? ; Who governed in Berlin? ; The troubled supremacy of Sir Edward Grey ; The Agadir Crisis of 1911 ; Soldiers and civilians ; The press and public opinion ; The fluidity of power -- Balkan entanglements : Air strikes on Libya ; Balkan helter-skelter ; The wobbler ; The Balkan Winter Crisis of 1912-13 ; Bulgaria or Serbia? ; Austria's troubles ; The Balkanization of the Franco-Russian alliance ; Paris forces the pace ; Poincaré under pressure -- Last chances: détente and danger, 1912-1914 :The limits of détente ; 'Now or never' ; Germans on the Bosphorus ; The Balkan inception scenario ; A crisis of masculinity? ; How open was the future? -- pt. III. Crisis. Murder in Sarajevo :The assassination ; Flashbulb moments ; The investigation begins ; Serbian responses ; What is to be done? -- The widening circle : Reactions abroad ; Count Hoyos goes to Berlin ; The road to the Austrian ultimatum ; The strange death of Nikolai Hartwig -- The French in St Petersburg : Count de Robien changes trains ; M. Poincaré sails to Russia ; The poker game -- The ultimatum : Austria demands ; Serbia responds ; A 'local war' begins -- Warning shots : Firmness prevails ; 'It's war this time' ; Russian reasons -- Last days : A strange light falls upon the map of Europe ; Poincaré returns to Paris ; Russia mobilizes ; The leap into the dark ; 'There must be some misunderstanding' ; The tribulations of Paul Cambon.

An authoritative chronicle, drawing on new research on World War I, traces the paths to war in a minute-by-minute narrative that examines the decades of history that informed the events of 1914.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Clark (Cambridge) has made stunning use of new diplomatic evidence in European archives to present a "new view" of the march to world war in 1914. The meticulous trail of diplomatic notes and telegrams increases the likelihood that the author's view of "blame all around" will become the prevailing theory. Key factors that Clark considers: even though the Great Power alliance system was in place (Triple Entente versus Triple Alliance), countries within these blocs had suspicions as to whether their "allies" would back them up in the event of war. The murder of Archduke Ferdinand in June 1914 may have lit the match, but the fact that war actually broke out in August 1914 shows that diplomacy failed in large measure to "localize" the conflict (as Germany hoped), and spotlights Russia's ruthless pan-Slav policy against Austria-Hungary, which forced German action against Belgium, drawing France and Great Britain into war. German historian Fritz Fischer may claim that German revanchism was key, and that diplomats who wrote the Versailles Treaty and Article 231 tried to pin war blame on Germany's "blank check" to Austria-Hungary, but Clark's measured approach shows in actuality that there was enough blame to go around. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Diplomatic scholars of the period, graduate level and above. A. M. Mayer College of Staten Island

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Christopher Clark is a noted historian. He is the twenty-second Regius Professor of History at the University of Cambridge. In 2015 he was knighted for his services to Anglo-German relations. Clark is the author of The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914, Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia, 1600-1947, Culture Wars: Secular-Catholic Conflict in Nineteenth-Century Europe, Kaiser Wilhelm II: A Life in Power, and The Politics of Conversion: Missionary Protestantism and the Jews in Prussia, 1728-1941. <p> Clark won the Wolfson History Prize and the Queensland Premier's Literary Award in 2007 for Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia, 1600-1947. His book The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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