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The war that ended peace : the road to 1914 / Margaret MacMillan.

By: MacMillan, Margaret, 1943-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Random House, 2013Edition: First U.S. Edition.Description: xxxv, 739 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781400068555 (alk. paper); 140006855X (alk. paper); 0812994701 (ebk.); 9780812994704 (ebk.).Subject(s): World War, 1914-1918 -- Causes
Contents:
Europe in 1900 -- Great Britain and splendid isolation -- The new Kaiser -- Weltpolitik -- Dreadnought -- Unlikely friends: the entente cordiale -- The bear and the whale: Russia and Great Britain -- The loyalty of the Nibelungs -- What were they thinking? -- Dreaming of peace -- Thinking about war -- Making the plans -- The crises start -- The Bosnian crisis -- 1911: the year of discords -- The first Balkan Wars -- Preparing for war or peace -- Assassination at Sarajevo -- The end game.
Summary: This work presents a narrative portrait of Europe in the years leading up to World War I that illuminates the political, cultural, and economic factors and contributing personalities that shaped major events.Summary: From the bestselling and award-winning author of Paris 1919 comes a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, a fascinating portrait of Europe from 1900 up to the outbreak of World War I. The century since the end of the Napoleonic wars had been the most peaceful era Europe had known since the fall of the Roman Empire. In the first years of the twentieth century, Europe believed it was marching to a golden, happy, and prosperous future. But instead, complex personalities and rivalries, colonialism and ethnic nationalisms, and shifting alliances helped to bring about the failure of the long peace and the outbreak of a war that transformed Europe and the world. The War That Ended Peace brings vividly to life the military leaders, politicians, diplomats, bankers, and the extended, interrelated family of crowned heads across Europe who failed to stop the descent into war: in Germany, the mercurial Kaiser Wilhelm II and the chief of the German general staff, Von Moltke the Younger; in Austria-Hungary, Emperor Franz Joseph, a man who tried, through sheer hard work, to stave off the coming chaos in his empire; in Russia, Tsar Nicholas II and his wife; in Britain, King Edward VII, Prime Minister Herbert Asquith, and British admiral Jacky Fisher, the fierce advocate of naval reform who entered into the arms race with Germany that pushed the continent toward confrontation on land and sea. There are the would-be peacemakers as well, among them prophets of the horrors of future wars whose warnings went unheeded: Alfred Nobel, who donated his fortune to the cause of international understanding, and Bertha von Suttner, a writer and activist who was the first woman awarded Nobel's new Peace Prize. Here too we meet the urbane and cosmopolitan Count Harry Kessler, who noticed many of the early signs that something was stirring in Europe; the young Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty and a rising figure in British politics; Madame Caillaux, who shot a man who might have been a force for peace; and more. With indelible portraits, MacMillan shows how the fateful decisions of a few powerful people changed the course of history. Taut, suspenseful, and impossible to put down, The War That Ended Peace is also a wise cautionary reminder of how wars happen in spite of the near-universal desire to keep the peace. Destined to become a classic in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman's The Guns of August, The War That Ended Peace enriches our understanding of one of the defining periods and events of the twentieth century. - Publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
D511 .M257 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002208866

Includes bibliographical references (pages 691-710) and index.

Europe in 1900 -- Great Britain and splendid isolation -- The new Kaiser -- Weltpolitik -- Dreadnought -- Unlikely friends: the entente cordiale -- The bear and the whale: Russia and Great Britain -- The loyalty of the Nibelungs -- What were they thinking? -- Dreaming of peace -- Thinking about war -- Making the plans -- The crises start -- The Bosnian crisis -- 1911: the year of discords -- The first Balkan Wars -- Preparing for war or peace -- Assassination at Sarajevo -- The end game.

This work presents a narrative portrait of Europe in the years leading up to World War I that illuminates the political, cultural, and economic factors and contributing personalities that shaped major events.

From the bestselling and award-winning author of Paris 1919 comes a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, a fascinating portrait of Europe from 1900 up to the outbreak of World War I. The century since the end of the Napoleonic wars had been the most peaceful era Europe had known since the fall of the Roman Empire. In the first years of the twentieth century, Europe believed it was marching to a golden, happy, and prosperous future. But instead, complex personalities and rivalries, colonialism and ethnic nationalisms, and shifting alliances helped to bring about the failure of the long peace and the outbreak of a war that transformed Europe and the world. The War That Ended Peace brings vividly to life the military leaders, politicians, diplomats, bankers, and the extended, interrelated family of crowned heads across Europe who failed to stop the descent into war: in Germany, the mercurial Kaiser Wilhelm II and the chief of the German general staff, Von Moltke the Younger; in Austria-Hungary, Emperor Franz Joseph, a man who tried, through sheer hard work, to stave off the coming chaos in his empire; in Russia, Tsar Nicholas II and his wife; in Britain, King Edward VII, Prime Minister Herbert Asquith, and British admiral Jacky Fisher, the fierce advocate of naval reform who entered into the arms race with Germany that pushed the continent toward confrontation on land and sea. There are the would-be peacemakers as well, among them prophets of the horrors of future wars whose warnings went unheeded: Alfred Nobel, who donated his fortune to the cause of international understanding, and Bertha von Suttner, a writer and activist who was the first woman awarded Nobel's new Peace Prize. Here too we meet the urbane and cosmopolitan Count Harry Kessler, who noticed many of the early signs that something was stirring in Europe; the young Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty and a rising figure in British politics; Madame Caillaux, who shot a man who might have been a force for peace; and more. With indelible portraits, MacMillan shows how the fateful decisions of a few powerful people changed the course of history. Taut, suspenseful, and impossible to put down, The War That Ended Peace is also a wise cautionary reminder of how wars happen in spite of the near-universal desire to keep the peace. Destined to become a classic in the tradition of Barbara Tuchman's The Guns of August, The War That Ended Peace enriches our understanding of one of the defining periods and events of the twentieth century. - Publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

The question of the causes of the Great War has occupied historians for decades and promises to continue to intrigue. MacMillan (history, Univ. of Toronto), prize winner for Paris 1919, reviews the dynamic tensions in Europe prior to 1914. She reminds readers that the leaders of several European nations were dealing with such issues as fears of revolution at home and abroad while maneuvering for an advantage in the military sphere. The series of crises in the Balkans may have convinced political and military minds that any impending conflict would be of short duration. So, as MacMillan notes, the war was perceived as one that would have almost a cleansing effect on the European world. It turned out much differently. This book adds to a growing corpus exploring the war's roots, including Michael S. Neiberg's Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of World War I, Frank C. Zagare's The Games of July: Explaining the Great War, and William Mulligan's The Origins of the First World War. MacMillan, who edited Barbara Tuchman's The Guns of August and The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890-1914 for the Library of America, writes in a style reminiscent of Tuchman. VERDICT This is a first-rate study, necessary for all World War I collections. Highly recommended.-Ed Goedeken, (EG) Iowa State Univ. Lib., Ames (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

MacMillan (international history, Oxford), author of the outstanding Paris, 1919: Six Months That Changed the World (CH, Apr'03, 40-4847) about the Treaty of Versailles, has written a serious work about the history of Europe leading up to the outbreak of WW I in 1914. She chooses to view WW I from the perspective of the great power conflict over crises in Morocco, the Balkan wars, the Russo-Japanese War, and, more importantly, the serious naval conflict between Great Britain and Germany. While MacMillan acknowledges that trade issues, colonialism, nationalism, and militarism also caused tensions, she makes clear that the Alliance System of the Entente Powers versus the Central Powers was more imprisoning than helpful in the buildup to war. However, key to the march to war was the recalcitrance of Austria-Hungary to settle the Serbian post-Sarajevo crisis of July 1914 without drawing in Germany; Russia's early mobilization in committed support of Serbia; and the mistaken belief by statesmen in Great Britain and France that Germany would somehow pull back from the brink when faced with Belgian resistance and the prospect of a two-front war. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Historians of the period and students of the history of 20th-century Europe. A. M. Mayer College of Staten Island

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Margaret MacMillan  received her PhD from Oxford University and is now a professor of international history at Oxford, where she is also the warden of St. Antony's College. She is a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature; a senior fellow of Massey College, University of Toronto; and an honorary fellow of Trinity College, University of Toronto, and of St Hilda's College, Oxford University. She sits on the boards of the Mosaic Institute and the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, and on the editorial boards of  The International History Review  and  First World War Studies . She also sits on the advisory board of the Institute for Historical Justice and Reconciliation and is a Trustee of the Rhodes Trust. Her previous books include  Dangerous Games: The Uses and Abuses of History, Nixon and Mao: The Week That Changed the World, Women of the Raj: The Mothers, Wives, and Daughters of the British Empire in India , and  Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World,  which won the Samuel Johnson Prize, the PEN Hessell-Tiltman Prize, and the Duff Cooper Prize and was a  New York Times  Editors' Choice.</p>

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