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The working classes in Victorian fiction [by] P.J. Keating.

By: Keating, P. J.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: London, Routledge and K. Paul, 1971Description: xiv, 310 p., 11 plates : illus., facsim., port. 23 cm.ISBN: 071006991X; 9780710069917.Subject(s): English fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Working class -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century | Working class writings, English -- History and criticism | Great Britain -- History -- Victoria, 1837-1901 | Working class in literatureDDC classification: 823/.03 LOC classification: PR878.L3 | K4 1971Other classification: HL 1020 | HL 1101
Contents:
The two traditions, 1820-80 -- New lines and continuing traditions -- George Gissing -- Walter Besant and the "discovery" of the East End -- French naturalism and English working-class fiction -- Rudyard Kipling and Cockney archetypes -- Arthur Morrison and the tone of violence -- The Cockney School -- Industrialism, urbanism and class conflict -- The phonetic representation of Cockney.
Summary: Examines the presentation of the urban and industrial working classes in Victorian fiction. Considers the different types of working men and women who appear in fiction, the environments they are shown to inhabit and the use of phonetics to indicate the sound of working class voices.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
PR878.L3 K4 1971 (Browse shelf) Available 0000101100022

Bibliography: p. [291]-301.

The two traditions, 1820-80 -- New lines and continuing traditions -- George Gissing -- Walter Besant and the "discovery" of the East End -- French naturalism and English working-class fiction -- Rudyard Kipling and Cockney archetypes -- Arthur Morrison and the tone of violence -- The Cockney School -- Industrialism, urbanism and class conflict -- The phonetic representation of Cockney.

Examines the presentation of the urban and industrial working classes in Victorian fiction. Considers the different types of working men and women who appear in fiction, the environments they are shown to inhabit and the use of phonetics to indicate the sound of working class voices.

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