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Civil War General and Indian Fighter James M. Williams : Leader of the 1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry and the 8th U.S. Cavalry

By: Lull, Robert W.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.War and the Southwest: Publisher: Denton : University of North Texas Press, 2013Description: 1 online resource (308 p.).ISBN: 9781574415124.Subject(s): Generals -- United States -- Biography | Indians of North America -- Wars -- 1866-1895 | United States. -- Army. -- Cavalry, 8th -- Biography | Williams, James M. -- (James Monroe), -- 1833-1907Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Civil War General and Indian Fighter James M. Williams : Leader of the 1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry and the 8th U.S. CavalryDDC classification: 355.0092 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; List of Illustrations; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Bleeding Kansas, Border Ruffians, and Jayhawkers; 2. Williams, Lane's Brigade, and the Civil War; 3. The First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment; 4. They "Fought Like Tigers:" Island Mound, Missouri; 5. The Regiment: "A Day of Great Rejoicing,"and Grim Reality at Sherwood; 6. Into Indian Territory: First Battle of Cabin Creek; 7. The Battle of Honey Springs, Indian Territory; 8. The Red River Campaign and the Camden Expedition; 9. The Battle of Poison Spring, Arkansas
10. Confederate Atrocities and Steele's Retreat11. A Brigade, Another Massacre, and Second Cabin Creek; 12. Back to Arkansas: Final Campaigns, Promotion,Peace, and Transition; 13. Indian Wars in the West with the Eighth Cavalry; 14. Campaigning: Fort Whipple, Arizona Territory; 15. Recuperation, a New Family, and Fort Selden, New Mexico Territory; 16. Fort Bayard, New Mexico Territory; 17. Frontier Ranching, Congressional Accolades, and Redemption; 18. Conclusion; Appendix; Notes; Bibliography
Summary: The military career of General James Monroe Williams spanned both the Civil War and the Indian Wars in the West, yet no biography has been published to date on his important accomplishments, until now. From his birth on the northern frontier, westward movement in the Great Migration, rush into the violence of antebellum Kansas Territory, Civil War commands in the Trans-Mississippi, and as a cavalry officer in the Indian Wars, Williams was involved in key moments of American history. Like many who make a difference, Williams was a leader of strong convictions, sometimes impatient with heavy-handed and sluggish authority. Building upon his political opinions and experience as a Jayhawker, Williams raised and commanded the ground-breaking 1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1862. His new regiment of black soldiers was the first such organization to engage Confederate troops, and the first to win. He enjoyed victories in Missouri, Indian Territory (Oklahoma), and Arkansas, but also fought in the abortive Red River Campaign and endured defeat and the massacre of his captured black troops at Poison Spring. In 1865, as a brigadier general, Williams led his troops in consolidating control of northern Arkansas. Williams played a key role in taking Indian Territory from Confederate forces, which denied routes of advance into Kansas and east into Arkansas. His 1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment helped turn the tide of Southern successes in the Trans-Mississippi, establishing credibility of black soldiers in the heat of battle. Following the Civil War, Williams secured a commission in the Regular Army's 8th Cavalry Regiment, serving in Arizona and New Mexico. His victories over Indians in Arizona won accolades for having "settled the Indian question in that part of Arizona." He finally left the military in 1873, debilitated from five wounds received at the hands of Confederates and hostile Indians.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
U21.5 .L384 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1189145 Available EBL1189145

CONTENTS; List of Illustrations; Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Bleeding Kansas, Border Ruffians, and Jayhawkers; 2. Williams, Lane's Brigade, and the Civil War; 3. The First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment; 4. They "Fought Like Tigers:" Island Mound, Missouri; 5. The Regiment: "A Day of Great Rejoicing,"and Grim Reality at Sherwood; 6. Into Indian Territory: First Battle of Cabin Creek; 7. The Battle of Honey Springs, Indian Territory; 8. The Red River Campaign and the Camden Expedition; 9. The Battle of Poison Spring, Arkansas

10. Confederate Atrocities and Steele's Retreat11. A Brigade, Another Massacre, and Second Cabin Creek; 12. Back to Arkansas: Final Campaigns, Promotion,Peace, and Transition; 13. Indian Wars in the West with the Eighth Cavalry; 14. Campaigning: Fort Whipple, Arizona Territory; 15. Recuperation, a New Family, and Fort Selden, New Mexico Territory; 16. Fort Bayard, New Mexico Territory; 17. Frontier Ranching, Congressional Accolades, and Redemption; 18. Conclusion; Appendix; Notes; Bibliography

The military career of General James Monroe Williams spanned both the Civil War and the Indian Wars in the West, yet no biography has been published to date on his important accomplishments, until now. From his birth on the northern frontier, westward movement in the Great Migration, rush into the violence of antebellum Kansas Territory, Civil War commands in the Trans-Mississippi, and as a cavalry officer in the Indian Wars, Williams was involved in key moments of American history. Like many who make a difference, Williams was a leader of strong convictions, sometimes impatient with heavy-handed and sluggish authority. Building upon his political opinions and experience as a Jayhawker, Williams raised and commanded the ground-breaking 1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1862. His new regiment of black soldiers was the first such organization to engage Confederate troops, and the first to win. He enjoyed victories in Missouri, Indian Territory (Oklahoma), and Arkansas, but also fought in the abortive Red River Campaign and endured defeat and the massacre of his captured black troops at Poison Spring. In 1865, as a brigadier general, Williams led his troops in consolidating control of northern Arkansas. Williams played a key role in taking Indian Territory from Confederate forces, which denied routes of advance into Kansas and east into Arkansas. His 1st Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiment helped turn the tide of Southern successes in the Trans-Mississippi, establishing credibility of black soldiers in the heat of battle. Following the Civil War, Williams secured a commission in the Regular Army's 8th Cavalry Regiment, serving in Arizona and New Mexico. His victories over Indians in Arizona won accolades for having "settled the Indian question in that part of Arizona." He finally left the military in 1873, debilitated from five wounds received at the hands of Confederates and hostile Indians.

Description based upon print version of record.

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