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Warfare, State and Society on the Black Sea Steppe, 1500-1700.

By: Davies, Brian.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Warfare and History: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (273 p.).ISBN: 9780203961766.Subject(s): Crimean Khanate - History, Military | Crimean Khanate -- History, Military | Crimean Khanate - Relations - Russia | Crimean Khanate - Relations - Ukraine | Crimean Khanate -- Relations -- Ukraine | Russia - Relations - Crimean Khanate | Russia -- Relations -- Crimean Khanate | Ukraine - History - 1648-1775 | Ukraine -- History -- 1648-1775 | Ukraine - Relations - Crimean Khanate | Ukraine -- Relations -- Crimean KhanateGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Warfare, State and Society on the Black Sea Steppe, 1500–1700DDC classification: 947.7/04 | 947.704 LOC classification: DK508.9.K78Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Book Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Archival sources; Abbreviations; Chapter One: Colonization, war, and slaveraiding on the Black Sea steppe in the sixteenth century; Chapter Two: Muscovy's southern borderland defense strategy, 1500-1635; Chapter Three: The Belgorod Line; Chapter Four: The Ukrainian quagmire; Chapter Five: The Chyhyryn campaigns and the wars of the Holy League; Chapter Six. The balance of power at century's end; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: This crucial period in Russia's history has, up until now, been neglected by historians, but here Brian L. Davies' study provides an essential insight into the emergence of Russia as a great power.For nearly three centuries, Russia vied with the Crimean Khanate, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Ottoman Empire for mastery of the Ukraine and the fertile steppes above the Black Sea, a region of great strategic and economic importance - arguably the pivot of Eurasia at the time.The long campaign took a great toll upon Russia's population, economy and institutions, and repeatedly frustrat
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DK508.9.K78 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=308649 Available EBL308649

Book Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Archival sources; Abbreviations; Chapter One: Colonization, war, and slaveraiding on the Black Sea steppe in the sixteenth century; Chapter Two: Muscovy's southern borderland defense strategy, 1500-1635; Chapter Three: The Belgorod Line; Chapter Four: The Ukrainian quagmire; Chapter Five: The Chyhyryn campaigns and the wars of the Holy League; Chapter Six. The balance of power at century's end; Notes; Bibliography; Index

This crucial period in Russia's history has, up until now, been neglected by historians, but here Brian L. Davies' study provides an essential insight into the emergence of Russia as a great power.For nearly three centuries, Russia vied with the Crimean Khanate, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and the Ottoman Empire for mastery of the Ukraine and the fertile steppes above the Black Sea, a region of great strategic and economic importance - arguably the pivot of Eurasia at the time.The long campaign took a great toll upon Russia's population, economy and institutions, and repeatedly frustrat

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Packed with detailed information and two good but complicated maps, this is not a book for beginners. But those with a good mental image of the region and its history or a good historical atlas in hand will find it highly informative. Davies (Univ. of Texas at San Antonio) follows closely the interactions of three regional superpowers--the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, Moscow, and the Ottoman Empire--and two independent-minded client peoples, the Tatars and Cossacks, neither of which could be kept in hand by the area's putative rulers. The author opens with an overview of warfare and slave-raiding (Tatars carried away a million people between 1500 and 1644), then discusses Moscow's borderland strategy. Switching to narratives of Poland's "Ukrainian Quagmire" (1654-64) and Moscow's Turkish wars, Davies gives a sophisticated rationale for the near collapse of the commonwealth and shows that Peter the Great's capture of Azov owes less to his genius than to the long-term policy of limiting Tatar raids and building a modern army. Though lacking the elegance of William McNeill Europe's Steppe Frontier, 1500-1800 (CH, Feb'65), the narrative is straightforward and clear. Thought-provoking insights will doubtless spark debate in many a graduate seminar. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, faculty. W. L. Urban Monmouth College (IL)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Briannbsp;L.nbsp;Davies is Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas at San Antonio. His publications include State Power and Community in Early Modern Russia: The Case of Kozlov, 1635-1649 (2004).

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