Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Lexical Priming in Spoken English Usage.

By: Pace-Sigge, Michael.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013Description: 1 online resource (245 p.).ISBN: 9781137331908.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Lexical Priming in Spoken English UsageLOC classification: P326.5.D38 | P334 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half-Title; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Content; List of figures; list of Tables; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Where lexical priming came from; 1.2 Lexical priming in spoken use; or, redefining the notion of dialect: the example of Liverpool English; 1.3 Potential value of this work; 1.3.1 In respect of dialectology; 1.3.2 In respect of lexical priming in Spoken English; 1.4 The casual spoken Liverpool English Corpus: SCO and its comparators; 1.5 Structure of this book; 2 Lexical Priming: The Theoretical Backbone; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Lexical Priming
2.2.1 Where lexical priming came from2.2.1.1 Collocation; 2.2.1.2 Colligation; 2.2.1.3 Semantic prosody, preference and association; 2.3 Lexical Priming in Context; 2.3.1 A brief description of lexical priming; 2.3.2 Lexical priming and spoken language; 2.3.3 Lexical priming issues; 2.4 Priming; 2.4.1 M. Ross Quillian and the language learning machine; 2.4.2 Facilitating access to the semantic memory; 2.4.3 Semantic priming of the lexical memory; 2.4.4 Priming in spoken usage; 2.4.5 Priming and how single words are embedded; 2.4.5.1 Compound Cues; 2.4.5.2 The issue of 'meaning'
2.4.5.3 The value of context2.4.6 Priming and the corpus; 2.5 Lexical Priming and Dialectology; 3 Testing the Theory through Spoken-Corpus Evidence; 3.1 Building the Liverpool English Corpus (SCO); 3.1.1 The use of 'Scouse' as an example; 3.1.2 General overview of the Liverpool spoken corpus; 3.1.3 Restrictions; 3.1.4 Method of SCO compilation; 3.2 Comparing SCO with other spoken English corpora; 3.3 WordSmith concordancing; 3.4 Statistical testing in the research chapters; 4 Spoken Differs from Written - The Case of YES and YEAH; 4.1 The case of spoken usage; 4.2 YEAH
4.2.1 Introduction of the term4.2.2 YEAH is not YES; 4.2.3 Comparison of YES and YEAH collocates; 4.2.4 Comparison of YES vs. YEAH clusters; 4.2.5 Comparison of YES vs. YEAH conclusion; 4.3 YEAH use in the Corpora; 4.3.1 YEAH collocates in the SCO and BNC/C corpora; 4.3.2 Most frequent YEAH clusters - detailed use; 4.3.3 YEAH with BUT; 4.3.4 YEAH with OH; 4.3.5 Repetition clusters of YEAH; 4.3.6 YEAH with RIGHT; 4.4 Conclusions for YEAH; 5 Referring to Oneself and Others in SCO and BNC/C; 5.1 Introduction to I; 5.2 I in the spoken corpora; 5.3 I collocates; 5.3.1 Differences in ranking
5.3.2 Collocates with different proportional use5.4 I Usage and Nesting; 5.4.1 I two-word clusters; 5.4.1.1 'I' two-word clusters: Areas of divergent use; 5.4.1.2 'I' two-word clusters: SCO more frequent than expected; 5.4.1.3 'I' two-word clusters: SCO less frequent than expected; 5.4.2 Longest-available clusters; 5.4.3 |You know|, |what I|, |I mean| - two-word clusters form a longer meaningful cluster; 5.5 Conclusions of 'I' usage in the corpora; 5.6 Third-party referents - a difference in degree, not in usage; 6 Use of Intensifiers and Discourse Particles in Casual Speech; 6.1 Uses of WELL
6.1.1 Introduction
Summary: This book shows that over forty years of psychological laboratory-based research support the claims of the Lexical Priming Theory. It examines how Lexical Priming applies to the use of spoken English as the book provides evidence that Lexical Priming is found in everyday spoken conversations.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
P326.5.D38 P334 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1571922 Available EBL1571922
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
P325.5.R44 S45 2013 Minimal Indirect Reference : P326.S56 2000 Language and the Lexicon : P326.S56 2000 Language and the Lexicon : P326.5.D38 P334 2013 Lexical Priming in Spoken English Usage. P326.5.I35 E947 2014 Idioms : P326.5.P45 C48 2014 Phase Theory : P327 .C384 2014 Investigating Lexis :

Cover; Half-Title; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Content; List of figures; list of Tables; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Where lexical priming came from; 1.2 Lexical priming in spoken use; or, redefining the notion of dialect: the example of Liverpool English; 1.3 Potential value of this work; 1.3.1 In respect of dialectology; 1.3.2 In respect of lexical priming in Spoken English; 1.4 The casual spoken Liverpool English Corpus: SCO and its comparators; 1.5 Structure of this book; 2 Lexical Priming: The Theoretical Backbone; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Lexical Priming

2.2.1 Where lexical priming came from2.2.1.1 Collocation; 2.2.1.2 Colligation; 2.2.1.3 Semantic prosody, preference and association; 2.3 Lexical Priming in Context; 2.3.1 A brief description of lexical priming; 2.3.2 Lexical priming and spoken language; 2.3.3 Lexical priming issues; 2.4 Priming; 2.4.1 M. Ross Quillian and the language learning machine; 2.4.2 Facilitating access to the semantic memory; 2.4.3 Semantic priming of the lexical memory; 2.4.4 Priming in spoken usage; 2.4.5 Priming and how single words are embedded; 2.4.5.1 Compound Cues; 2.4.5.2 The issue of 'meaning'

2.4.5.3 The value of context2.4.6 Priming and the corpus; 2.5 Lexical Priming and Dialectology; 3 Testing the Theory through Spoken-Corpus Evidence; 3.1 Building the Liverpool English Corpus (SCO); 3.1.1 The use of 'Scouse' as an example; 3.1.2 General overview of the Liverpool spoken corpus; 3.1.3 Restrictions; 3.1.4 Method of SCO compilation; 3.2 Comparing SCO with other spoken English corpora; 3.3 WordSmith concordancing; 3.4 Statistical testing in the research chapters; 4 Spoken Differs from Written - The Case of YES and YEAH; 4.1 The case of spoken usage; 4.2 YEAH

4.2.1 Introduction of the term4.2.2 YEAH is not YES; 4.2.3 Comparison of YES and YEAH collocates; 4.2.4 Comparison of YES vs. YEAH clusters; 4.2.5 Comparison of YES vs. YEAH conclusion; 4.3 YEAH use in the Corpora; 4.3.1 YEAH collocates in the SCO and BNC/C corpora; 4.3.2 Most frequent YEAH clusters - detailed use; 4.3.3 YEAH with BUT; 4.3.4 YEAH with OH; 4.3.5 Repetition clusters of YEAH; 4.3.6 YEAH with RIGHT; 4.4 Conclusions for YEAH; 5 Referring to Oneself and Others in SCO and BNC/C; 5.1 Introduction to I; 5.2 I in the spoken corpora; 5.3 I collocates; 5.3.1 Differences in ranking

5.3.2 Collocates with different proportional use5.4 I Usage and Nesting; 5.4.1 I two-word clusters; 5.4.1.1 'I' two-word clusters: Areas of divergent use; 5.4.1.2 'I' two-word clusters: SCO more frequent than expected; 5.4.1.3 'I' two-word clusters: SCO less frequent than expected; 5.4.2 Longest-available clusters; 5.4.3 |You know|, |what I|, |I mean| - two-word clusters form a longer meaningful cluster; 5.5 Conclusions of 'I' usage in the corpora; 5.6 Third-party referents - a difference in degree, not in usage; 6 Use of Intensifiers and Discourse Particles in Casual Speech; 6.1 Uses of WELL

6.1.1 Introduction

This book shows that over forty years of psychological laboratory-based research support the claims of the Lexical Priming Theory. It examines how Lexical Priming applies to the use of spoken English as the book provides evidence that Lexical Priming is found in everyday spoken conversations.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michael Pace-Sigge is Senior Lecturer in the School of Humanities at the University of Eastern Finland. He was previously a Lecturer at the University of Liverpool, UK. Michael's research interests include Corpus Linguistics, Lexical Priming, the Merseyside/Liverpool English (Scouse) accent, Phonetics, Sociolinguistics and Spoken English use.<br> <br> <br>

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.