Good-Bye Hegemony! : Power and Influence in the Global System

By: Reich, SimonContributor(s): Lebow, Richard NedMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (207 p.)ISBN: 9780691160436Subject(s): Balance of power -- History -- 21st century | International relations -- History -- 21st century | World politics -- 21st centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Good-Bye Hegemony! : Power and Influence in the Global SystemDDC classification: 327.1 | 327.11 LOC classification: JZ1310 .R45 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Tables; Preface; Chapter 1: The Wall Has Fallen; Chapter 2: Power and Influence in the Global System; Chapter 3: Europe and Agenda Setting; Chapter 4: China and Custodial Economic Management; Chapter 5: America and Security Sponsorship; Chapter 6: The Future of International Relations; Index
Summary: Many policymakers, journalists, and scholars insist that U.S. hegemony is essential for warding off global chaos. Good-Bye Hegemony! argues that hegemony is a fiction propagated to support a large defense establishment, justify American claims to world leadership, and buttress the self-esteem of voters. It is also contrary to American interests and the global order. Simon Reich and Richard Ned Lebow argue that hegemony should instead find expression in agenda setting, economic custodianship, and the sponsorship of global initiatives. Today, these functions are diffused through the system, wit
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Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; List of Tables; Preface; Chapter 1: The Wall Has Fallen; Chapter 2: Power and Influence in the Global System; Chapter 3: Europe and Agenda Setting; Chapter 4: China and Custodial Economic Management; Chapter 5: America and Security Sponsorship; Chapter 6: The Future of International Relations; Index

Many policymakers, journalists, and scholars insist that U.S. hegemony is essential for warding off global chaos. Good-Bye Hegemony! argues that hegemony is a fiction propagated to support a large defense establishment, justify American claims to world leadership, and buttress the self-esteem of voters. It is also contrary to American interests and the global order. Simon Reich and Richard Ned Lebow argue that hegemony should instead find expression in agenda setting, economic custodianship, and the sponsorship of global initiatives. Today, these functions are diffused through the system, wit

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Following years of debate about American decline and policies that can return the US to hegemonic supremacy, Reich (Rutgers Univ.) and Lebow (King's College London) analyze hegemony at its conceptual roots, pointing out its theoretical contradictions and the illusions about US hegemony held by scholars, policy makers, and the American public. The authors argue that one key mistake in concepts and policies designed to reinforce hegemony is the incorrect assumption that power equals influence. Influence is better defined as persuasion, something that, especially in a globalized world, is more readily achieved through negotiation than through the use of force or coercion. Their reconceptualization of hegemony helps explain how the US would fail to achieve its objectives in Afghanistan and Iraq during a "unipolar era." Replacing the concept of hegemony based on power with an influence-based hegemony, the authors suggest that the US should focus on developing post-hegemonic policies that have wide legitimacy among nation-states. The US hegemonic era passed in the 1960s, and today no nation wants hegemony or could reach such a level. Reich and Lebow feel that accepting those realities is a first step to more practical and successful US foreign policies. --William W. Newmann, Virginia Commonwealth University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Simon Reich is professor of global affairs and political science at Rutgers University, Newark.
Richard Ned Lebow is professor of international political theory at Kings College London and the James O. Freedman Presidential Professor of Government Emeritus at Dartmouth College.

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