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When the Earth Roars : Lessons from the History of Earthquakes in Japan

By: Smits, Gregory.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Asia/Pacific/Perspectives: Publisher: Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014Description: 1 online resource (227 p.).ISBN: 9781442220102.Subject(s): Earthquakes -- Japan -- History | Earthquakes -- Japan | EarthquakesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: When the Earth Roars : Lessons from the History of Earthquakes in JapanDDC classification: 551.220952 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One: Setting the Stage; Chapter Two: Early Modern Earthquakes and Their Modern Relevance; Chapter Three: Nōbi and Great Kantō; Chapter Four: Prewar Tsunamigenic Earthquakes in the Northeast; Chapter Five: Prediction to Forecasting; Chapter Six: Conclusions; Glossary of Terms and Entities; Bibliography; Index; About the Author
Summary: Japan, which is among the most earthquake-prone regions in the world, has a long history of responding to seismic disasters. However, despite advances in earthquake-related safety technologies, the destructiveness of the magnitude 9 class earthquake and tsunami that struck the country on 3/11 raised profound questions about how societies can deal effectively with seismic hazards. Tracing the history of earthquakes in Japan, Gregory Smits identifies a cycle of overconfidence and unreasonable expectations with roots as far back as the 1830 Kyoto Earthquake. The author argues that the events of M
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QE537.2 .J3 S543 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1657092 Available EBL1657092

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One: Setting the Stage; Chapter Two: Early Modern Earthquakes and Their Modern Relevance; Chapter Three: Nōbi and Great Kantō; Chapter Four: Prewar Tsunamigenic Earthquakes in the Northeast; Chapter Five: Prediction to Forecasting; Chapter Six: Conclusions; Glossary of Terms and Entities; Bibliography; Index; About the Author

Japan, which is among the most earthquake-prone regions in the world, has a long history of responding to seismic disasters. However, despite advances in earthquake-related safety technologies, the destructiveness of the magnitude 9 class earthquake and tsunami that struck the country on 3/11 raised profound questions about how societies can deal effectively with seismic hazards. Tracing the history of earthquakes in Japan, Gregory Smits identifies a cycle of overconfidence and unreasonable expectations with roots as far back as the 1830 Kyoto Earthquake. The author argues that the events of M

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Smits (Pennsylvania State Univ.; Seismic Japan, CH, Aug'14, 51-6771) offers a very well-written and insightful study of the eternal quest to create and validate the shaky science of earthquake prediction. Basing his book on an analysis of major earthquakes in Japan over the last 200 years, including the earthquake and tsunami of 3/11, the author concludes that it is impossible to predict them (neither their timing nor location). He bases this conclusion on an easily understandable description of the geology of earthquakes. Unfortunately, the resources of government and the scientific community, particularly in Japan, are fixated on this misguided task; in the postwar era, this effort has shifted from "predicting" to "forecasting." Smits argues that great benefits can accrue by using earthquakes and their results as precedents and guideposts to instead focus resources on mitigating their social and economic impact. For example, lessons from earlier earthquakes in the Tohoku region of Japan might very well have reduced the impact of the disastrous 3/11 events. This valuable, persuasive, and very readable study will appeal to all interested in the history of modern Japan, the history of earthquakes in Japan, and the science of seismology. --Mark D. Ericson, University of Maryland University College

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