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An Engineer's Guide to Mathematica.

By: Magrab, Edward B.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Hoboken : Wiley, 2014Description: 1 online resource (453 p.).ISBN: 9781118821251.Subject(s): Engineering mathematics | Mathematica (Computer file)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: An Engineer's Guide to MathematicaDDC classification: 510.285/53 | 510.28553 LOC classification: TA345.5.M38 M34 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
AN ENGINEER'S GUIDE TO MATHEMATICA®; Contents; Preface; Table of Engineering Applications; Part I Introduction; 1 Mathematica® Environment and Basic Syntax; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Selecting Notebook Characteristics; 1.3 Notebook Cells; 1.4 Delimiters; 1.5 Basic Syntax; 1.5.1 Introduction; 1.5.2 Templates: Greek Symbols and Mathematical Notation; 1.5.3 Variable Names and Global Variables; 1.6 Mathematical Constants; 1.7 Complex Numbers; 1.8 Elementary, Trigonometric, Hyperbolic, and a Few Special Functions; 1.9 Strings; 1.9.1 String Creation: StringJoin[] and ToString[]
1.9.2 Labeled Output: Print[], NumberForm[], EngineeringForm[], and TraditionalForm[]1.10 Conversions, Relational Operators, and Transformation Rule; 1.11 Engineering Units and Unit Conversions: Quantity[] and UnitConvert[]; 1.12 Creation of CDF Documents and Documents in Other Formats; 1.13 Functions Introduced in Chapter; Exercises; 2 List Creation and Manipulation: Vectors and Matrices; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Creating Lists and Vectors; 2.2.1 Introduction; 2.2.2 Creating a List with Table[]; 2.2.3 Summing Elements of a List: Total[]; 2.2.4 Selecting Elements of a List
2.2.5 Identifying List Elements Matching a Pattern: Position[]2.3 Creating Matrices; 2.3.1 Introduction; 2.3.2 Matrix Generation Using Table[]; 2.3.3 Accessing Elements of Arrays; 2.4 Matrix Operations on Vectors and Arrays; 2.4.1 Introduction; 2.4.2 Matrix Inverse and Determinant: Inverse[] and Det[]; 2.5 Solution of a Linear System of Equations: LinearSolve[]; 2.6 Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors: EigenSystem[]; 2.7 Functions Introduced in Chapter 2; References; Exercises; 3 User-Created Functions, Repetitive Operations, and Conditionals; 3.1 Introduction
3.2 Expressions and Procedures as Functions3.2.1 Introduction; 3.2.2 Pure Function: Function[]; 3.2.3 Module[]; 3.3 Find Elements of a List that Meet a Criterion: Select[]; 3.4 Conditionals; 3.4.1 If[]; 3.4.2 Which[]; 3.5 Repetitive Operations; 3.5.1 Do[]; 3.5.2 While[]; 3.5.3 Nest[]; 3.5.4 Map[]; 3.6 Examples of Repetitive Operations and Conditionals; 3.7 Functions Introduced in Chapter; Exercises; 4 Symbolic Operations; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Assumption Options; 4.3 Solutions of Equations: Solve[]; 4.4 Limits: Limit[]; 4.5 Power Series: Series[], Coefficient[], and CoefficientList[]
4.6 Optimization: Maximize[]/Minimize[]4.7 Differentiation: D[]; 4.8 Integration: Integrate[]; 4.9 Solutions of Ordinary Differential Equations: DSolve[]; 4.10 Solutions of Partial Differential Equations: DSolve[]; 4.11 Laplace Transform: LaplaceTransform[] and InverseLaplaceTransform[]; 4.12 Functions Introduced in Chapter; References; Exercises; 5 Numerical Evaluations of Equations; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Numerical Integration: NIntegrate[]; 5.3 Numerical Solutions of Differential Equations: NDSolveValue[] and ParametricNDSolveValue[]; 5.4 Numerical Solutions of Equations: NSolve[]
5.5 Roots of Transcendental Equations: FindRoot[]
Summary: Provides the tools for the reader to generate Mathematica® programs to obtain numerical solutions to a wide range of engineering topics An Engineer's Guide to Mathematica® provides the tools to be able to generate verifiably correct Mathematica® programs that obtain symbolic and numerical solutions to a wide range of engineering topics, and to display the numerical results with annotated graphics and, when appropriate, interactive graphics.  The first part of the book introduces the fundamentals of Mathematica's syntax and a subset of commands useful in solving engineering problems.  The se
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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TA345.5.M38 M34 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1662670 Available EBL1662670

AN ENGINEER'S GUIDE TO MATHEMATICA®; Contents; Preface; Table of Engineering Applications; Part I Introduction; 1 Mathematica® Environment and Basic Syntax; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Selecting Notebook Characteristics; 1.3 Notebook Cells; 1.4 Delimiters; 1.5 Basic Syntax; 1.5.1 Introduction; 1.5.2 Templates: Greek Symbols and Mathematical Notation; 1.5.3 Variable Names and Global Variables; 1.6 Mathematical Constants; 1.7 Complex Numbers; 1.8 Elementary, Trigonometric, Hyperbolic, and a Few Special Functions; 1.9 Strings; 1.9.1 String Creation: StringJoin[] and ToString[]

1.9.2 Labeled Output: Print[], NumberForm[], EngineeringForm[], and TraditionalForm[]1.10 Conversions, Relational Operators, and Transformation Rule; 1.11 Engineering Units and Unit Conversions: Quantity[] and UnitConvert[]; 1.12 Creation of CDF Documents and Documents in Other Formats; 1.13 Functions Introduced in Chapter; Exercises; 2 List Creation and Manipulation: Vectors and Matrices; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Creating Lists and Vectors; 2.2.1 Introduction; 2.2.2 Creating a List with Table[]; 2.2.3 Summing Elements of a List: Total[]; 2.2.4 Selecting Elements of a List

2.2.5 Identifying List Elements Matching a Pattern: Position[]2.3 Creating Matrices; 2.3.1 Introduction; 2.3.2 Matrix Generation Using Table[]; 2.3.3 Accessing Elements of Arrays; 2.4 Matrix Operations on Vectors and Arrays; 2.4.1 Introduction; 2.4.2 Matrix Inverse and Determinant: Inverse[] and Det[]; 2.5 Solution of a Linear System of Equations: LinearSolve[]; 2.6 Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors: EigenSystem[]; 2.7 Functions Introduced in Chapter 2; References; Exercises; 3 User-Created Functions, Repetitive Operations, and Conditionals; 3.1 Introduction

3.2 Expressions and Procedures as Functions3.2.1 Introduction; 3.2.2 Pure Function: Function[]; 3.2.3 Module[]; 3.3 Find Elements of a List that Meet a Criterion: Select[]; 3.4 Conditionals; 3.4.1 If[]; 3.4.2 Which[]; 3.5 Repetitive Operations; 3.5.1 Do[]; 3.5.2 While[]; 3.5.3 Nest[]; 3.5.4 Map[]; 3.6 Examples of Repetitive Operations and Conditionals; 3.7 Functions Introduced in Chapter; Exercises; 4 Symbolic Operations; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Assumption Options; 4.3 Solutions of Equations: Solve[]; 4.4 Limits: Limit[]; 4.5 Power Series: Series[], Coefficient[], and CoefficientList[]

4.6 Optimization: Maximize[]/Minimize[]4.7 Differentiation: D[]; 4.8 Integration: Integrate[]; 4.9 Solutions of Ordinary Differential Equations: DSolve[]; 4.10 Solutions of Partial Differential Equations: DSolve[]; 4.11 Laplace Transform: LaplaceTransform[] and InverseLaplaceTransform[]; 4.12 Functions Introduced in Chapter; References; Exercises; 5 Numerical Evaluations of Equations; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Numerical Integration: NIntegrate[]; 5.3 Numerical Solutions of Differential Equations: NDSolveValue[] and ParametricNDSolveValue[]; 5.4 Numerical Solutions of Equations: NSolve[]

5.5 Roots of Transcendental Equations: FindRoot[]

Provides the tools for the reader to generate Mathematica® programs to obtain numerical solutions to a wide range of engineering topics An Engineer's Guide to Mathematica® provides the tools to be able to generate verifiably correct Mathematica® programs that obtain symbolic and numerical solutions to a wide range of engineering topics, and to display the numerical results with annotated graphics and, when appropriate, interactive graphics.  The first part of the book introduces the fundamentals of Mathematica's syntax and a subset of commands useful in solving engineering problems.  The se

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Dr. Magrab is Emeritus Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. Before joining the University of Maryland, he was Chief of the Sound Section, head of the Robot Metrology Group, and led the development of the vertical machining workstation in the Automated Manufacturing Research Facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). He went to NIST after being a professor in the Department of Mechanics at the Catholic University of America in Washington DC. Dr. Magrab is a Life Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a registered professional engineer in Maryland. He has authored eight other textbooks, published numerous journal articles, and has over 35 years of university-level teaching experience on many engineering subjects. His research interests include analytical and experimental investigations in vibrations, acoustics, and the integration of design and manufacturing. He holds one patent.</p>

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