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British Strategy and War Aims 1914-1916 (RLE First World War).

By: French, David.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.Routledge Library Editions: The First World War: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (291 p.).ISBN: 9781317686958.Subject(s): Europe -- Foreign relations -- Great Britain | Great Britain -- Foreign relations -- Europe | Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1910-1936 | World War, 1914-1918 -- Diplomatic historyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: British Strategy and War Aims 1914-1916 (RLE First World War)DDC classification: 940.4/012 | 940.4012 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Original Title Page; Original Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1 The Ententes and the Security of the British Empire; 2 Maritime Operations, August-October 1914; 3 Russia, Turkey and the Balkans, September-December 1914; 4 The Search for an Entente Strategy, December 1914-February 1915; 5 The Constantinople Agreement, Italy and the Collapse of the Asquith Government, February-May 1915; 6 The Asquith Coalition and the Policy of Attrition, May-August 1915
7 Men, Money and Munitions: Mobilizing the British Economy for War in the Summer of 19158 Britain and the 'Drang nach dem Osten', 1915-16; 9 Britain and the Development of the Entente's Policies in the Winter of 1915-16; 10 Verdun to the Somme, February to June 1916; 11 From the Somme to Bucharest, July-August 1916; 12 The Strategic Background to the Collapse of the Asquith Coalition; 13 Conclusion: Victory or Bankruptcy?; Bibliography; Index
Summary: <P>This book illustrates the relationship between British military policy and the development of British war aims during the opening years of the First World War. Basing his work on a wide range of unpublished documentary sources, David French reassesses for the benefit of students and scholars alike what was meant by 'a war of attrition'. </P>
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D621.G7 F74 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1664264 Available EBL1664264

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Original Title Page; Original Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction; 1 The Ententes and the Security of the British Empire; 2 Maritime Operations, August-October 1914; 3 Russia, Turkey and the Balkans, September-December 1914; 4 The Search for an Entente Strategy, December 1914-February 1915; 5 The Constantinople Agreement, Italy and the Collapse of the Asquith Government, February-May 1915; 6 The Asquith Coalition and the Policy of Attrition, May-August 1915

7 Men, Money and Munitions: Mobilizing the British Economy for War in the Summer of 19158 Britain and the 'Drang nach dem Osten', 1915-16; 9 Britain and the Development of the Entente's Policies in the Winter of 1915-16; 10 Verdun to the Somme, February to June 1916; 11 From the Somme to Bucharest, July-August 1916; 12 The Strategic Background to the Collapse of the Asquith Coalition; 13 Conclusion: Victory or Bankruptcy?; Bibliography; Index

This book illustrates the relationship between British military policy and the development of British war aims during the opening years of the First World War. Basing his work on a wide range of unpublished documentary sources, David French reassesses for the benefit of students and scholars alike what was meant by 'a war of attrition'.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

For this, his second book, French consulted some 40 collections of private papers, innumerable departmental records, and a great many memoirs and secondary sources. His scholarship is apparent in a narrative at once densely packed and lucid, and in his telling a familiar story in a significantly new way. Britain's leaders, French writes, believed ``victory or defeat would be measured at the end of the war by Britain's ability to impose its peace terms not only on its enemies but on its allies as well.'' In 1914, the British expected their allies to stop the Central Powers on land while Britain, as in the Napoleonic Wars, supplied credits and naval power, which eventually would tell for the entente. During 1915, it began to appear that the allies could not or would not stand the strain indefinitely, and it was this danger, French argues, that occasioned internal rift among the british. Conscriptionists thought Britain had to field a large army or else risk defeat. To their adversaries, conscription represented the ``high road to national bankruptcy,'' as it would disable the British economy. By April 1916, the cabinet decided ``bankruptcy was preferable to defeat.'' Even with Britain as a strong land power, however, the entente might not defeat the Central Powers, and only on ``American sufferance'' could the entente continue fighting at its present scale. Britain's economic independence was eroding, leaving exposed its claims to be a great power. For what happens next, in 191718, the author promises a sequel. This reviewer eagerly awaits it. College, university, and public libraries.-P.K. Cline, Earlham College

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