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Civil War Journalism.

By: Risley, Ford.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Reflections on the Civil War Era: Publisher: Santa Barbara : ABC-CLIO, 2012Description: 1 online resource (184 p.).ISBN: 9780313347283.Subject(s): Journalism - United States - History - 19th century | Press and politics - United States - History - 19th century | United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Journalists | United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Press coverageGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Civil War JournalismDDC classification: 973.3 LOC classification: E609 | .R575 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Series Foreword; Preface and Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One: Reporting the War; Chapter Two: Illustrations and Photographs; Chapter Three: Editorial Support and Criticism; Chapter Four: Censorship and Suppression; Chapter Five: Impact of the War; Epilogue; Notes; Bibliographical Essay; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: The Civil War was the first American war widely covered by the press, with an estimated 500 reporters from the North and South covering the conflict. Thousands of photographs were taken during the war, and more than 3,000 illustrations and cartoons were published in magazines, along with daily articles and editorials about the conflict as well. As a result, the press played a significant role in the war, just as the war played an important role in the development of the press.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E609 .R575 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1114889 Available EBL1114889
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E608 .T69 2014 Surveillance and Spies in the Civil War : E608.V34 -- V37 2003 Southern Lady, Yankee Spy : E609 -- .P74 2014 A Press Divided : E609 .R575 2012 Civil War Journalism. E611 .F66 2016 The Yankee plague : E611 .F66 2017 Yankee plague : E615 Living by Inches

Cover; Contents; Series Foreword; Preface and Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter One: Reporting the War; Chapter Two: Illustrations and Photographs; Chapter Three: Editorial Support and Criticism; Chapter Four: Censorship and Suppression; Chapter Five: Impact of the War; Epilogue; Notes; Bibliographical Essay; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

The Civil War was the first American war widely covered by the press, with an estimated 500 reporters from the North and South covering the conflict. Thousands of photographs were taken during the war, and more than 3,000 illustrations and cartoons were published in magazines, along with daily articles and editorials about the conflict as well. As a result, the press played a significant role in the war, just as the war played an important role in the development of the press.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The Civil War represents a turning point in American history. The war also led to noteworthy changes in journalism. Risley (communication and journalism, Penn State) describes these changes, offering a brief look at print media coverage in both North and South. He discusses war reporting, journalists, censorship, illustrations/photography, and the impact of the war. He includes famous reporters whose careers the war advanced: Horace Greeley, Peter Alexander, Matthew Brady, Thomas Nast, Alfred Wand. Photography, then a new medium, visually portrayed realities of battle: Antietam "captured the real horror of the battlefield [and brought home] the terrible reality and earnestness of war." Shortages of supplies and staff plagued numerous Southern newspapers, with many in occupied towns closing or being seized. Northern papers experienced a boom, adding afternoon editions in order to print additional news. Risley observes that the print press came of age during the war as newspapers helped make Americans "a nation of newspaper and magazine readers": journalism developed more professional standards; black-owned newspapers began to appear; the telegraph made it possible to report news faster; magazines and papers flourished. A valuable work for those interested in the history of journalism and of the Civil War. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above; general readers. R. Ray Mississippi State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Ford Risley is professor of communications and head of the Department of Journalism at Penn State University.</p>

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