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Impossible Subjects : Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America

By: Ngai, Mae M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (411 p.).ISBN: 9781400850235.Subject(s): Citizenship -- United States -- History | Emigration and immigration law -- United States -- History | Illegal aliens -- United States -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Impossible Subjects : Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern AmericaDDC classification: 342.73083 LOC classification: JV6483 .N49 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Table of Contents; List of Figures and Illustrations; List of Tables; Acknowledgments; Note on Language and Terminology; Foreword to the New Paperback Edition; Introduction: Illegal Aliens: A Problem of Law and History; PART I: THE REGIME OF QUOTAS AND PAPERS; One: The Johnson-Reed Act of 1924 and the Reconstruction of Race in Immigration Law; Two: Deportation Policy and the Making and Unmaking of Illegal Aliens; PART II: MIGRANTS AT THE MARGINS OF LAW AND NATION; Three: From Colonial Subject to Undesirable Alien: Filipino Migration in the Invisible Empire
Four: Braceros, "Wetbacks," and the National Boundaries of ClassPART III: WAR, NATIONALISM, ANDALIEN CITIZENSHIP; Five: The World War II Internment of Japanese Americans and the Citizenship Renunciation Cases; Six: The Cold War Chinese Immigration Crisis and the Confession Cases; PART IV: PLURALISM AND NATIONALISM IN POST-WORLD WAR II IMMIGRATION REFORM; Seven: The Liberal Critique and Reform of Immigration Policy; Epilogue; Appendix; Notes; Archival and Other Primary Sources; Index
Summary: This book traces the origins of the "illegal alien" in American law and society, explaining why and how illegal migration became the central problem in U.S. immigration policy-a process that profoundly shaped ideas and practices about citizenship, race, and state authority in the twentieth century. Mae Ngai offers a close reading of the legal regime of restriction that commenced in the 1920s-its statutory architecture, judicial genealogies, administrative enforcement, differential treatment of European and non-European migrants, and long-term effects. She shows that immigration restriction, p
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JV6483 .N49 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1584940 Available EBL1584940

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Table of Contents; List of Figures and Illustrations; List of Tables; Acknowledgments; Note on Language and Terminology; Foreword to the New Paperback Edition; Introduction: Illegal Aliens: A Problem of Law and History; PART I: THE REGIME OF QUOTAS AND PAPERS; One: The Johnson-Reed Act of 1924 and the Reconstruction of Race in Immigration Law; Two: Deportation Policy and the Making and Unmaking of Illegal Aliens; PART II: MIGRANTS AT THE MARGINS OF LAW AND NATION; Three: From Colonial Subject to Undesirable Alien: Filipino Migration in the Invisible Empire

Four: Braceros, "Wetbacks," and the National Boundaries of ClassPART III: WAR, NATIONALISM, ANDALIEN CITIZENSHIP; Five: The World War II Internment of Japanese Americans and the Citizenship Renunciation Cases; Six: The Cold War Chinese Immigration Crisis and the Confession Cases; PART IV: PLURALISM AND NATIONALISM IN POST-WORLD WAR II IMMIGRATION REFORM; Seven: The Liberal Critique and Reform of Immigration Policy; Epilogue; Appendix; Notes; Archival and Other Primary Sources; Index

This book traces the origins of the "illegal alien" in American law and society, explaining why and how illegal migration became the central problem in U.S. immigration policy-a process that profoundly shaped ideas and practices about citizenship, race, and state authority in the twentieth century. Mae Ngai offers a close reading of the legal regime of restriction that commenced in the 1920s-its statutory architecture, judicial genealogies, administrative enforcement, differential treatment of European and non-European migrants, and long-term effects. She shows that immigration restriction, p

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mae M. Ngai is professor of history and Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies at Columbia University. Her books include The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America .

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