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The Origins of the Urban Crisis : Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit

By: Sugrue, Thomas J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Princeton Classics: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (433 p.).ISBN: 9781400851218.Subject(s): African Americans -- Michigan -- Detroit -- Economic conditions -- 20th century | African Americans -- Michigan --Detroit -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Detroit (Mich.) -- Economic conditions -- 20th century | Detroit (Mich.) -- Race relations | Detroit (Mich.) -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Poverty -- Michigan -- Detroit -- History -- 20th century | Racism -- Michigan -- Detroit -- History -- 20th century | Urban renewal -- Michigan -- DetroitGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Origins of the Urban Crisis : Race and Inequality in Postwar DetroitDDC classification: 305.8/00977434 LOC classification: F574 .D49Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Tables; Preface to the Princeton Classic Edition; Preface to the 2005 Edition; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part One: Arsenal; 1. "Arsenal of Democracy"; 2. "Detroit's Time Bomb": Race and Housing in the 1940s; 3. "The Coffin of Peace": The Containment of Public Housing; Part Two: Rust; 4. "The Meanest and the Dirtiest Jobs": The Structures of Employment Discrimination; 5. "The Damning Mark of False Prosperities": The Deindustrialization of Detroit
6. "Forget about Your Inalienable Right to Work": Responses to Industrial Decline and DiscriminationPart Three: Fire; 7. Class, Status, and Residence: The Changing Geography of Black Detroit; 8. "Homeowners' Rights": White Resistance and the Rise of Antiliberalism; 9. "United Communities Are Impregnable": Violence and the Color Line; Conclusion. Crisis: Detroit and the Fate of Postindustrial America; Appendixes; A. Index of Dissimilarity, Blacks and Whites in Major American Cities, 1940-1990; B. African American Occupational Structure in Detroit, 1940-1970; List of Abbreviations in the Notes
NotesIndex
Summary: Once America's "arsenal of democracy," Detroit is now the symbol of the American urban crisis. In this reappraisal of America's racial and economic inequalities, Thomas Sugrue asks why Detroit and other industrial cities have become the sites of persistent racialized poverty. He challenges the conventional wisdom that urban decline is the product of the social programs and racial fissures of the 1960s. Weaving together the history of workplaces, unions, civil rights groups, political organizations, and real estate agencies, Sugrue finds the roots of today's urban poverty in a hidden history o
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F574.D457 D66 2012 Detroit's Cold War : F574.D457 D66 2013 Detroit's Cold War : F574.D457 G35 2012 Driving Detroit : F574 .D49 The Origins of the Urban Crisis : F574.D49 1992 Life for us is what we make it : F574.D49 A25 2014 Managing inequality : F574.D49 A6538 2009 Citizenship and crisis :

Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; List of Illustrations; List of Tables; Preface to the Princeton Classic Edition; Preface to the 2005 Edition; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part One: Arsenal; 1. "Arsenal of Democracy"; 2. "Detroit's Time Bomb": Race and Housing in the 1940s; 3. "The Coffin of Peace": The Containment of Public Housing; Part Two: Rust; 4. "The Meanest and the Dirtiest Jobs": The Structures of Employment Discrimination; 5. "The Damning Mark of False Prosperities": The Deindustrialization of Detroit

6. "Forget about Your Inalienable Right to Work": Responses to Industrial Decline and DiscriminationPart Three: Fire; 7. Class, Status, and Residence: The Changing Geography of Black Detroit; 8. "Homeowners' Rights": White Resistance and the Rise of Antiliberalism; 9. "United Communities Are Impregnable": Violence and the Color Line; Conclusion. Crisis: Detroit and the Fate of Postindustrial America; Appendixes; A. Index of Dissimilarity, Blacks and Whites in Major American Cities, 1940-1990; B. African American Occupational Structure in Detroit, 1940-1970; List of Abbreviations in the Notes

NotesIndex

Once America's "arsenal of democracy," Detroit is now the symbol of the American urban crisis. In this reappraisal of America's racial and economic inequalities, Thomas Sugrue asks why Detroit and other industrial cities have become the sites of persistent racialized poverty. He challenges the conventional wisdom that urban decline is the product of the social programs and racial fissures of the 1960s. Weaving together the history of workplaces, unions, civil rights groups, political organizations, and real estate agencies, Sugrue finds the roots of today's urban poverty in a hidden history o

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Thomas J. Sugrue is the David Boies Professor of History and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of Not Even Past: Barack Obama and the Burden of Race (Princeton) and Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North.

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