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Entranced by Story : Brain, Tale and Teller, from Infancy to Old Age

By: Crago, Hugh.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Children''s Literature and Culture: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (286 p.).ISBN: 9781317806707.Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Entranced by Story : Brain, Tale and Teller, from Infancy to Old AgeOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Half Title ; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Series Editor's Foreword; Acknowledgments; Introduction Entranced by Story; Chapter 1 'Bothe Blysse and Blunder': How Stories Begin; Chapter 2 'A Hole in the World': Self and Story in the Preschool Years; Chapter 3 'A Place of Greater Safety': Stories in Middle Childhood; Chapter 4 The Age of Romance: Self and Story in Adolescence; Chapter 5 'I Would Build That Dome in Air': Story Making in Young Adulthood; Chapter 6 Remembering, Repeating and Foreshadowing: Midlife and Memory
Chapter 7 Light at the End of the Tunnel: Storytelling in Old AgeConclusion The Brain, the Tale and the Teller; Notes; References; Index
Summary: We live in a world of stories; yet few of us pause to ask what stories actually are, why we consume them so avidly, and what they do for story makers and their audiences. This book focuses on the experiences that good stories generate: feelings of purposeful involvement, elevation, temporary loss of self, vicarious emotion, and relief of tension. The author examines what drives writers to create stories and why readers fall under their spell; why some children grow up to be writers; and how the capacity for creating and comprehending stories develops from infancy right through into old age.Entranced by Story applies recent research on brain function to literary examples ranging from the Iliad and Wuthering Heights to Harold and the Purple Crayon, providing a groundbreaking exploration of the biological and neurological basis of the literary experience. Blending research, theory, and biographical anecdote, the author shows how it is the unique structure of the human brain, with its layering of sophisticated cognitive capacities upon archaic, emotion-driven functions, which best explains the mystery of story.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1682285 Available EBL1682285

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Half Title ; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; Series Editor's Foreword; Acknowledgments; Introduction Entranced by Story; Chapter 1 'Bothe Blysse and Blunder': How Stories Begin; Chapter 2 'A Hole in the World': Self and Story in the Preschool Years; Chapter 3 'A Place of Greater Safety': Stories in Middle Childhood; Chapter 4 The Age of Romance: Self and Story in Adolescence; Chapter 5 'I Would Build That Dome in Air': Story Making in Young Adulthood; Chapter 6 Remembering, Repeating and Foreshadowing: Midlife and Memory

Chapter 7 Light at the End of the Tunnel: Storytelling in Old AgeConclusion The Brain, the Tale and the Teller; Notes; References; Index

We live in a world of stories; yet few of us pause to ask what stories actually are, why we consume them so avidly, and what they do for story makers and their audiences. This book focuses on the experiences that good stories generate: feelings of purposeful involvement, elevation, temporary loss of self, vicarious emotion, and relief of tension. The author examines what drives writers to create stories and why readers fall under their spell; why some children grow up to be writers; and how the capacity for creating and comprehending stories develops from infancy right through into old age.Entranced by Story applies recent research on brain function to literary examples ranging from the Iliad and Wuthering Heights to Harold and the Purple Crayon, providing a groundbreaking exploration of the biological and neurological basis of the literary experience. Blending research, theory, and biographical anecdote, the author shows how it is the unique structure of the human brain, with its layering of sophisticated cognitive capacities upon archaic, emotion-driven functions, which best explains the mystery of story.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Hugh Crago has taught literature, human development and counselling in Australia, and recently retired as Senior Lecturer in Counselling at the University of Western Sydney. He is co-author of Prelude to Literacy: A Preschool Child's Encounter with Picture and Story , author of A Circle Unbroken: The Hidden Emotional Patterns that Shape Our Lives , and has published widely on children's literature, social change, welfare policy, family therapy and counsellor training. He currently maintains a private practice in Blackheath, near Sydney, and contributes a regular column to Psychotherapy in Australia magazine.</p>

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