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Breadlines Knee-Deep in Wheat : Food Assistance in the Great Depression

By: Poppendieck, Janet.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (401 p.).ISBN: 9780520958425.Subject(s): Agriculture and state -- United States -- History | Depressions -- 1929 -- United States | Food relief -- United States -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Breadlines Knee-Deep in Wheat : Food Assistance in the Great DepressionDDC classification: 363.8 | 363.8/83/0973 | 363.8830973 LOC classification: HV696.F6Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Introduction: The Paradox of Want amid Plenty; List of Abbreviations; ONE: The Plight of the Farmer; TWO: Depression: Deprivation and Despair; THREE: The Politics of Wheat and Drought; FOUR: Government Grain for the Needy; FIVE: The End of the Hoover Era; SIX: The Promise of the New Deal; SEVEN: The Little Pigs: The Genesis of Relief Distribution; EIGHT: The Federal Surplus Relief Corporation; NINE: The Corporation in Conflict: Competition with Private Enterprise; TEN: Transfer to the Department of Agriculture
ELEVEN: Accommodation to Agricultural PrioritiesTWELVE: Food Assistance: The Legacy of New Deal Policy Choices; Epilogue; Acknowledgments to the 2014 Edition; Sources; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: At no time during the Great Depression was the contradiction between agriculture surplus and widespread hunger more wrenchingly graphic than in the government's attempt to raise pork prices through the mass slaughter of miliions of ""unripe"" little pigs. This contradiction was widely perceived as a ""paradox."" In fact, as Janet Poppendieck makes clear in this newly expanded and updated volume, it was a normal, predictable working of an economic system rendered extreme by the Depression. The notion of paradox, however, captured the imagination of the public and policy makers, and it was to th
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Cover; Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Introduction: The Paradox of Want amid Plenty; List of Abbreviations; ONE: The Plight of the Farmer; TWO: Depression: Deprivation and Despair; THREE: The Politics of Wheat and Drought; FOUR: Government Grain for the Needy; FIVE: The End of the Hoover Era; SIX: The Promise of the New Deal; SEVEN: The Little Pigs: The Genesis of Relief Distribution; EIGHT: The Federal Surplus Relief Corporation; NINE: The Corporation in Conflict: Competition with Private Enterprise; TEN: Transfer to the Department of Agriculture

ELEVEN: Accommodation to Agricultural PrioritiesTWELVE: Food Assistance: The Legacy of New Deal Policy Choices; Epilogue; Acknowledgments to the 2014 Edition; Sources; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

At no time during the Great Depression was the contradiction between agriculture surplus and widespread hunger more wrenchingly graphic than in the government's attempt to raise pork prices through the mass slaughter of miliions of ""unripe"" little pigs. This contradiction was widely perceived as a ""paradox."" In fact, as Janet Poppendieck makes clear in this newly expanded and updated volume, it was a normal, predictable working of an economic system rendered extreme by the Depression. The notion of paradox, however, captured the imagination of the public and policy makers, and it was to th

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This book provides historical perspective on two of today's important public issues: farm income and hunger. It analyzes the origins of a national food assistance policy during the Thirties, when an attempt to solve the seeming paradox of simultaneous hunger and food surplus drove much of the public debate. Poppendieck demonstrates that food programs came to be seen by an organized farm lobby as a way of alleviating huge farm commodity surpluses. Unraveling the interrelated and complex agricultural and assistance policies, particularly for those unfamiliar with the terminology and bureaucracy, requires a good deal of skill. Poppendieck largely succeeds. The story she tells of good intentions gone bad, however, does not offer much hope for policy solutions to current farm and hunger problems. For informed laypersons, scholars, and specialists. Charles K. Piehl, Director of Grants Management, Mankato State Univ., Minn. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

When first published in 1986, Breadlines Knee-Deep in Wheat (CH, Oct'86) quickly became the essential work on government food assistance efforts during the New Deal. Among its contributions was the realization that government efforts in food assistance were connected to and at times undercut by attempts to end the agricultural depression. In this updated and expanded edition, Poppendieck (emer., Hunter College) applies her original thesis to the government's policies from the 1970s to the Great Recession. The Reagan administration's efforts at welfare reform and the shrinking of government are featured as some of the most significant developments in government food assistance policy since the first edition. The author's analysis of the development of "government cheese" is particularly interesting. In the epilogue, Poppendieck brings together the work of the first and second editions in the compelling question of why, in the face of continuing attacks on government entitlement programs, food assistance programs continue to survive. This new edition makes an important contribution to food assistance studies, and remains required reading for anyone interested in the history of food assistance in the US. --Martin William Quirk, Rock Valley College

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