Women in Nazi Germany.

By: Stephenson, JillMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (241 p.)ISBN: 9781317876083Subject(s): Germany -- Politics and government -- 1933-1945 | Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter-Partei | Women -- Germany -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women in Nazi GermanyDDC classification: 301.41/2/0943 | 301.4120943 LOC classification: HQ1623 .S73 2014Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; List of tables; List of maps; Author's acknowledgements; Publisher's acknowledgements; Chronology; Maps; PART ONE: INTRODUCTION; 1 German women and National Socialism; Introduction; The Nazis' inheritance; Who were 'women in Nazi Germany'?; Nazi ideology and its limitations; PART TWO: WOMEN IN THE RACIAL STATE; 2 Reproduction, family, sexuality; Reproduction as racial policy; Marriage and motherhood in 'valuable' families; Motherhood in 'hereditarily unhealthy' and 'asocial' families
Birth control: contraception and abortion'Sexual deviants': single mothers, lesbians, prostitutes; Wartime marriages and wartime liaisons; 3 Women at work; Patterns of employment from depression to war; The employment question in wartime; The modern economy: industry; The modern economy: white-collar and clerical work; The modern economy: the professions; The traditional economy: domestic service; The traditional economy: small-scale farming; 4 Education, socialization, organization; Education and opportunity; Youth organizations; Service schemes; Non-Nazi women's organizations
Nazi women's organizations: growth and 'co-ordination'Nazi 'women's work', 1934-39; 5 The crisis of war; War on the home front; Bombing of towns; Consumers and the 'black market'; Migrants, evacuees and refugees; Nazi women at war; The last days of the war; 6 Opponents, perpetrators and the persecuted; Opposition and reprisals; Perpetrators: warders, professionals, denunciators; The persecuted: non-'Aryan' women; The persecuted: inmates of prisons and the camps; The persecuted: non-German women workers; Can women be classed as either victims or perpetrators?; PART THREE: ASSESSMENT
7 Three issues: class, empowerment and international comparisonsThe salience of class in Nazi Germany; Was there anything 'emancipatory' about the Nazi women's organizations?; Were women in Nazi Germany discriminated against to a greater extent than women elsewhere?; PART FOUR: DOCUMENTS; Glossary; Who's who; References; Guide to further reading; Index; Plates
Summary: From images of jubilant mothers offering the Nazi salute, to Eva Braun and Magda Goebbels, women in Hitler's Germany and their role as supporters and guarantors of the Third Reich continue to exert a particular fascination. This account moves away from the stereotypes to provide a more complete picture of how they experienced Nazism in peacetime and at war. What was the status and role of women in pre-Nazi Germany and how did different groups of women respond to the Nazi project in practice? Jill Stephenson looks at the social, cultural and economic organisation of women's lives under Nazism, and assesses opposing claims that German women were either victims or villains of National Socialism.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1623 .S73 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1688937 Available EBL1688937

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Dedication; Table of Contents; List of tables; List of maps; Author's acknowledgements; Publisher's acknowledgements; Chronology; Maps; PART ONE: INTRODUCTION; 1 German women and National Socialism; Introduction; The Nazis' inheritance; Who were 'women in Nazi Germany'?; Nazi ideology and its limitations; PART TWO: WOMEN IN THE RACIAL STATE; 2 Reproduction, family, sexuality; Reproduction as racial policy; Marriage and motherhood in 'valuable' families; Motherhood in 'hereditarily unhealthy' and 'asocial' families

Birth control: contraception and abortion'Sexual deviants': single mothers, lesbians, prostitutes; Wartime marriages and wartime liaisons; 3 Women at work; Patterns of employment from depression to war; The employment question in wartime; The modern economy: industry; The modern economy: white-collar and clerical work; The modern economy: the professions; The traditional economy: domestic service; The traditional economy: small-scale farming; 4 Education, socialization, organization; Education and opportunity; Youth organizations; Service schemes; Non-Nazi women's organizations

Nazi women's organizations: growth and 'co-ordination'Nazi 'women's work', 1934-39; 5 The crisis of war; War on the home front; Bombing of towns; Consumers and the 'black market'; Migrants, evacuees and refugees; Nazi women at war; The last days of the war; 6 Opponents, perpetrators and the persecuted; Opposition and reprisals; Perpetrators: warders, professionals, denunciators; The persecuted: non-'Aryan' women; The persecuted: inmates of prisons and the camps; The persecuted: non-German women workers; Can women be classed as either victims or perpetrators?; PART THREE: ASSESSMENT

7 Three issues: class, empowerment and international comparisonsThe salience of class in Nazi Germany; Was there anything 'emancipatory' about the Nazi women's organizations?; Were women in Nazi Germany discriminated against to a greater extent than women elsewhere?; PART FOUR: DOCUMENTS; Glossary; Who's who; References; Guide to further reading; Index; Plates

From images of jubilant mothers offering the Nazi salute, to Eva Braun and Magda Goebbels, women in Hitler's Germany and their role as supporters and guarantors of the Third Reich continue to exert a particular fascination. This account moves away from the stereotypes to provide a more complete picture of how they experienced Nazism in peacetime and at war. What was the status and role of women in pre-Nazi Germany and how did different groups of women respond to the Nazi project in practice? Jill Stephenson looks at the social, cultural and economic organisation of women's lives under Nazism, and assesses opposing claims that German women were either victims or villains of National Socialism.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.