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Gary Snyder and the Pacific Rim : Creating Countercultural Community

By: Gray, Timothy.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Contemp North American Poetry: Publisher: Iowa City : University of Iowa Press, 2006Description: 1 online resource (377 p.).ISBN: 9781587296666.Subject(s): Authors, American -- Homes and haunts -- Pacific Coast (North America) | California -- Intellectual life -- 20th century | Counterculture -- California | Pacific Coast (North America) -- In literature | Pacific Coast (North America) -- Intellectual life | Snyder, Gary, 1930- -- Criticism and interpretation | Snyder, Gary, 1930- -- Homes and haunts -- Pacific Coast (North America) | Snyder, Gary, 1930- -- Knowledge -- Pacific Coast (North America)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Gary Snyder and the Pacific Rim : Creating Countercultural CommunityDDC classification: 811.5409 | 811/.5409 LOC classification: PS3569PS3569.N88 Z667 2006PS3569.N88Z667 2006Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; The Pacific Rim and the San Francisco Renaissance: Two Communities "Taking Place" in Midcentury America; 1. Migrating: Exploring the Creaturely Byways of the Pacific Northwest; 2. Translating: The Poetics of Linking East and West; 3. Embodying: Human Geography and the Way to the Back Country; 4. Communing: Tribal Passions in the Late 1960s; Digging In: The Reinhabitation of Turtle Island; Notes; Index
Summary: In Gary Snyder and the Pacific Rim, Timothy Gray draws upon previously unpublished journals and letters as well as his own close readings of Gary Snyder's well-crafted poetry and prose to track the early career of a maverick intellectual whose writings powered the San Francisco Renaissance of the 1950s and 1960s. Exploring various aspects of cultural geography, Gray asserts that this west coast literary community seized upon the idea of a Pacific Rim regional structure in part to recognize their Orientalist desires and in part to consolidate their opposition to America's cold war ideology, which tended to divide East from West. The geographical consciousness of Snyder's writing was particularly influential, Gray argues, because it gave San Francisco's Beat and hippie cultures a set of physical coordinates by which they could chart their utopian visions of peace and love.
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PS3569 | PS3569.N88 Z667 2006 | PS3569.N88Z667 2006 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=843122 Available EBL843122

Contents; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; The Pacific Rim and the San Francisco Renaissance: Two Communities "Taking Place" in Midcentury America; 1. Migrating: Exploring the Creaturely Byways of the Pacific Northwest; 2. Translating: The Poetics of Linking East and West; 3. Embodying: Human Geography and the Way to the Back Country; 4. Communing: Tribal Passions in the Late 1960s; Digging In: The Reinhabitation of Turtle Island; Notes; Index

In Gary Snyder and the Pacific Rim, Timothy Gray draws upon previously unpublished journals and letters as well as his own close readings of Gary Snyder's well-crafted poetry and prose to track the early career of a maverick intellectual whose writings powered the San Francisco Renaissance of the 1950s and 1960s. Exploring various aspects of cultural geography, Gray asserts that this west coast literary community seized upon the idea of a Pacific Rim regional structure in part to recognize their Orientalist desires and in part to consolidate their opposition to America's cold war ideology, which tended to divide East from West. The geographical consciousness of Snyder's writing was particularly influential, Gray argues, because it gave San Francisco's Beat and hippie cultures a set of physical coordinates by which they could chart their utopian visions of peace and love.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In many ways, Snyder's work presents a formidable challenge to literary critics under the sway of one or another urbane theory: after all, here is a poet whose oeuvre is, above all else, down-to-earth. As such, it runs against the grain of prevailing aesthetic standards in academic criticism. Enter Timothy Gray (College of Staten Island, CUNY), who here incorporates both previous literary scholarship focused on Snyder (e.g., that of Tim Dean and Julia Martin) and the work of anthropologists such as James Clifford in order "to show how a white writer located himself psychically and physically in what Cold War America usually deemed Asian space, but which the poet himself deemed part of an interconnected geographical realm." In his effort to highlight "the importance of mobility and diffusion in Snyder's life and work," Gray strikes a laudable balance between sketching cultural context and offering perceptive close readings of significant poems. With its originality of perspective, thoroughness of research, and clarity of prose, this book assumes pride of place among critical studies focused on Snyder and his work. ^BSumming Up: Essential. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. J. P. O'Grady Rocky Mountain College

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