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Rooted : Seven Midwest Writers of Place

By: Pichaske, David R.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.American Land & Life: Publisher: Iowa City : University of Iowa Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (383 p.).ISBN: 9781587296734.Subject(s): American literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | American literature -- Middle West -- History and criticism | Authors, American -- Homes and haunts -- Middle West | Landscapes in literature | Middle West -- In literature | Middle West -- Social life and customs | Place (Philosophy) in literature | Setting (Literature)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Rooted : Seven Midwest Writers of PlaceDDC classification: 810.9/327709045 | 810.9327709045 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Foreword; Preface and Acknowledgments; 1 Midwestern Literature; 2 Dave Etter: Call it Cornbelt Baroque; 3 William Kloefkorn: Looking Back over the Shoulder of Memory; 4 Norbert Blei: Portrait of the Artist as an Outsider; 5 Linda Hasselstrom: It Is "Like Far"; 6 Bill Holm: Holm and Away; 7 Jim Heynen: Parables of Innocence and Experience; 8 Jim Harrison: Reluctant Postmodernist; Notes; Works Cited; Index
Summary: David Pichaske has been writing and teaching about midwestern literature for three decades. In Rooted, by paying close attention to text, landscape, and biography, he examines the relationship between place and art. His focus is on seven midwestern authors who came of age toward the close of the twentieth century, their lives and their work grounded in distinct places: Dave Etter in small-town upstate Illinois; Norbert Blei in Door County, Wisconsin; William Kloefkorn in southern Kansas and Nebraska; Bill Holm in Minneota, Minnesota; Linda Hasselstrom in Hermosa, South Dakota; Jim Heynen in Sioux County, Iowa; and Jim Harrison in upper Michigan. The writers' intimate knowledge of place is reflected in their use of details of geography, language, environment, and behavior. Yet each writer reaches toward other geographies and into other dimensions of art or thought: jazz music and formalism in the case of Etter; gender issues in the case of Hasselstrom; time past and present in the case of Kloefkorn; ethnicity and the role of the artist in the case of Blei; magical realism in the case of Heynen; the landscape of literature in the case of Holm; and the curious worlds of academia, best-selling novels, and Hollywood films in the case of Harrison. The result, Pichaske notes, is the growing away from roots, the explorations and alter egos of these writers of place, and the tension between the "here" and "there" that gives each writer's art the complexity it needs to transcend provincial boundaries. Quoting generously from the writers, Pichaske employs a practical, jargon-free literary analysis fixed in the text, making Rooted interesting, readable, and especially useful in treating the literary categories of memoir and literary essay that have become important in recent decades.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS273 | PS273 .P54 2006 | PS273.P54 2006 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=843160 Available EBL843160

Contents; Foreword; Preface and Acknowledgments; 1 Midwestern Literature; 2 Dave Etter: Call it Cornbelt Baroque; 3 William Kloefkorn: Looking Back over the Shoulder of Memory; 4 Norbert Blei: Portrait of the Artist as an Outsider; 5 Linda Hasselstrom: It Is "Like Far"; 6 Bill Holm: Holm and Away; 7 Jim Heynen: Parables of Innocence and Experience; 8 Jim Harrison: Reluctant Postmodernist; Notes; Works Cited; Index

David Pichaske has been writing and teaching about midwestern literature for three decades. In Rooted, by paying close attention to text, landscape, and biography, he examines the relationship between place and art. His focus is on seven midwestern authors who came of age toward the close of the twentieth century, their lives and their work grounded in distinct places: Dave Etter in small-town upstate Illinois; Norbert Blei in Door County, Wisconsin; William Kloefkorn in southern Kansas and Nebraska; Bill Holm in Minneota, Minnesota; Linda Hasselstrom in Hermosa, South Dakota; Jim Heynen in Sioux County, Iowa; and Jim Harrison in upper Michigan. The writers' intimate knowledge of place is reflected in their use of details of geography, language, environment, and behavior. Yet each writer reaches toward other geographies and into other dimensions of art or thought: jazz music and formalism in the case of Etter; gender issues in the case of Hasselstrom; time past and present in the case of Kloefkorn; ethnicity and the role of the artist in the case of Blei; magical realism in the case of Heynen; the landscape of literature in the case of Holm; and the curious worlds of academia, best-selling novels, and Hollywood films in the case of Harrison. The result, Pichaske notes, is the growing away from roots, the explorations and alter egos of these writers of place, and the tension between the "here" and "there" that gives each writer's art the complexity it needs to transcend provincial boundaries. Quoting generously from the writers, Pichaske employs a practical, jargon-free literary analysis fixed in the text, making Rooted interesting, readable, and especially useful in treating the literary categories of memoir and literary essay that have become important in recent decades.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Pichaske (Southwest Minnesota State Univ.; editor in chief, Spoon River Poetry Press) offers here excellent introductions to seven contemporary midwestern writers, all of them working class, white, and from small towns: Dave Etter (Illinois), William Kloefkorn (Kansas-Nebraska plains), Norbert Blei (Wisconsin), Linda Hasselstrom (South Dakota), Bill Holm (Minnesota), Jim Heynen (Iowa), and Jim Harrison (Upper Michigan). Because all these writers consciously celebrate the uniqueness of their individual locales, they run the risk of being dismissed as local/regional writers. Pichaske argues for serious consideration of their work, and he delves into their individual styles and discusses their representation of the "realism" of a place, especially how they have intimately linked topography, nature, and people. Because each of these authors has written books in various genres, the book cannot offer in-depth analyses. Pichaske has worked with some of these writers in his capacity as editor, and this adds depth but also may shade his interpretations. This caveat aside, Pichaske's presentation is solid, and this book will be a valuable resource for those interested in the literature of place in general and midwestern literature in particular. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. All readers; all levels. D. W. Werden West Texas A&M University

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