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Images of Germany in American Literature.

By: Zacharasiewicz, Waldemar.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Iowa City : University of Iowa Press, 2007Description: 1 online resource (264 p.).ISBN: 9781587297786.Subject(s): Agricultural industries - Environmental aspects - Middle West | Agricultural industries - Middle West | American literature -- Germany -- Influence | American literature -- History and criticism | Germans in literature | Germany -- In literature | Germany -- Symbolic representation | Middle West - Economic conditions - 21st century | Packing-houses - Middle WestGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Images of Germany in American LiteratureDDC classification: 810.9 LOC classification: HD9417HD9417.M55W37 2007-PS159.G3 Z26 2007Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; 1. Introduction: Images of Germany in America; 2. Discovering Germany: The Early Nineteenth Century; 3. Differing Responses: The Late Nineteenth Century; 4. Transatlantic Encounters: Fin-de-siècle Estrangement; 5. Cultural Conflicts: The Early Twentieth Century; 6. Interlude: Before World War II; 7. The Return of Clichés: The World War II Years; 8. The Burden of the Past: Post-War Germany; 9. Conclusion: A Look toward the Future; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Waldemar Zacharasiewicz explores the cultural and historical background of the varied images of Germany and Germans in American literature throughout the past two centuries. Using an interdisciplinary approach known as comparative imagology, which borrows from social psychology and cultural anthropology, Zacharasiewicz samples a broad spectrum of original sources, including literary works, letters, diaries, autobiographical accounts, travelogues, newspaper reports, films, and even cartoons and political caricatures.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HD9417 | HD9417.M55W37 2007- | PS159.G3 Z26 2007 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=843245 Available EBL843245

CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; 1. Introduction: Images of Germany in America; 2. Discovering Germany: The Early Nineteenth Century; 3. Differing Responses: The Late Nineteenth Century; 4. Transatlantic Encounters: Fin-de-siècle Estrangement; 5. Cultural Conflicts: The Early Twentieth Century; 6. Interlude: Before World War II; 7. The Return of Clichés: The World War II Years; 8. The Burden of the Past: Post-War Germany; 9. Conclusion: A Look toward the Future; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Waldemar Zacharasiewicz explores the cultural and historical background of the varied images of Germany and Germans in American literature throughout the past two centuries. Using an interdisciplinary approach known as comparative imagology, which borrows from social psychology and cultural anthropology, Zacharasiewicz samples a broad spectrum of original sources, including literary works, letters, diaries, autobiographical accounts, travelogues, newspaper reports, films, and even cartoons and political caricatures.

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Zacharasiewicz (Univ. of Vienna) uses fiction, nonfiction, travelogue, and personal narrative to explore the representation of Germany in American literature since the 19th century. He traces the changing American "heterostereotype" of the German in connection with political events including the two world wars, the Holocaust, and the Cold War and through readings of texts by such diverse authors as Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper, Kay Boyle, Kate Chopin, Henry and William James, George Santayana, W. E. B. Du Bois, Henry Adams, John Dewey, H. L. Mencken, Theodore Dreiser, Edith Wharton, Sinclair Lewis, Thomas Wolfe, Katherine Anne Porter, Gertrude Stein, Kurt Vonnegut, Thomas Pynchon, William Styron, and Walter Abish. Zacharasiewicz's methodology relies on "comparative imagology," i.e., "the study of residual public attitudes apparent in the prevalent images of a society and the ways of representing ethnic groups and nations." Although this framework introduces Anglophone audiences to a new approach, it sometimes leads to troubling generalizations. The book's coverage is comprehensive, but this is a specialized text marred by overly complicated syntax that can impede comprehension. Summing Up: Optional. Graduate students, researchers, and faculty. H. D. Baer University of Oklahoma

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