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Purple Passages : Pound, Eliot, Zukofsky, Olson, Creeley, and the Ends of Patriarchal Poetry

By: DuPlessis, Rachel Blau.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Contemp North American Poetry: Publisher: Iowa City : University of Iowa Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (262 p.).ISBN: 9781609380946.Subject(s): American poetry - 20th century - History and criticism | American poetry -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Gender identity in literature | Gender identity in literature | Literature and society - United States - History - 20th century | Literature and society -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Masculinity in literature | Masculinity in literature | Patriarchy in literature | Patriarchy in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Purple Passages : Pound, Eliot, Zukofsky, Olson, Creeley, and the Ends of Patriarchal PoetryDDC classification: 811.509353 | 811/.509353 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Part One; 1. Manifesting Literary Feminism; 2. Pound Edits Loy and Eliot; 3. Succession and Supersession, from Z to "A"; Part Two; 4. Poetic Projects of Countercultural Manhood; 5. Sex/Gender Contradictions in Olson and Boldereff; 6. Olson's "Long Exaggeration of Males"; 7. Wieners and Creeley after Olson; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary:  What is patriarchal poetry? How can it be both attractive and tempting and yet be so hegemonic that it is invisible? How does it combine various mixes of masculinity, femininity, effeminacy, and eroticism? At once passionate and dispassionate, Rachel Blau DuPlessis meticulously outlines key moments of choice and debate about masculinity among writers as disparate as Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, Louis Zukofsky, Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, and Allen Ginsberg, choices that construct consequential models for institutions of poetic practice. As DuPlessis writes, "There are no genderless subjects in any relationship structuring literary culture: not in production, dissemination, or reception; not in objects, discourses, or practices; not in reading experiences or in interpretations." And, as she reveals in careful and enthralling detail, for the poets at the center of this book, questions of masculinity loomed large and were continuously articulated in their self-creation as writers, in literary bonding, and in its deployment. These gender-laden choices, debates, and contradictions all have a striking influence today. In this empathic yet critical historical polemic, DuPlessis reveals the outcomes of these many investments in the radical reconstruction of masculinity, in their strains, incompleteness, tensions-and failures. At the heart of modernist maleness and poetic practices are contradictions and urgencies, gender ideas both progressive and defensive.In a striking book on male behavior in poetic dyads, the third book in a feminist critical trilogy, DuPlessis tracks the poetic debates and arguments about gender that continuously affirm patriarchal poetry. 
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS323 | PS323.5 .D87 2012 | PS323.5.D87 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=912122 Available EBL912122

Contents; Acknowledgments; Part One; 1. Manifesting Literary Feminism; 2. Pound Edits Loy and Eliot; 3. Succession and Supersession, from Z to "A"; Part Two; 4. Poetic Projects of Countercultural Manhood; 5. Sex/Gender Contradictions in Olson and Boldereff; 6. Olson's "Long Exaggeration of Males"; 7. Wieners and Creeley after Olson; Notes; Bibliography; Index

 What is patriarchal poetry? How can it be both attractive and tempting and yet be so hegemonic that it is invisible? How does it combine various mixes of masculinity, femininity, effeminacy, and eroticism? At once passionate and dispassionate, Rachel Blau DuPlessis meticulously outlines key moments of choice and debate about masculinity among writers as disparate as Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, Louis Zukofsky, Charles Olson, Robert Creeley, and Allen Ginsberg, choices that construct consequential models for institutions of poetic practice. As DuPlessis writes, "There are no genderless subjects in any relationship structuring literary culture: not in production, dissemination, or reception; not in objects, discourses, or practices; not in reading experiences or in interpretations." And, as she reveals in careful and enthralling detail, for the poets at the center of this book, questions of masculinity loomed large and were continuously articulated in their self-creation as writers, in literary bonding, and in its deployment. These gender-laden choices, debates, and contradictions all have a striking influence today. In this empathic yet critical historical polemic, DuPlessis reveals the outcomes of these many investments in the radical reconstruction of masculinity, in their strains, incompleteness, tensions-and failures. At the heart of modernist maleness and poetic practices are contradictions and urgencies, gender ideas both progressive and defensive.In a striking book on male behavior in poetic dyads, the third book in a feminist critical trilogy, DuPlessis tracks the poetic debates and arguments about gender that continuously affirm patriarchal poetry. 

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

An eminent modernist critic, DuPlessis (emer., Temple Univ.) scrutinizes gender attitudes in some key figures in 20th-century American poetry. She has a strong grasp of the role of friendships and mentorships in avant-garde movements: literary movements tend to be highly personal, and the relationships are often conflicted. Her close readings of texts prevent her work from being too theoretical, though her feminist commitments are always clear: she wants to critique patriarchal attitudes in poetry. She is excellent on Ezra Pound's editing of Mina Loy and T. S. Eliot and perceptive on Louis Zukofsky's tortured relationship with Ezra Pound, his anti-Semitic mentor. Her searching look at Charles Olson's interactions with Robert Creeley are brilliant, and Olson's rather shabby sexism is revealed in two devastating chapters. DuPlessis acknowledges the growing sensitivity to gender relations in Creeley's late work. The book is concise but fully documented through revealing footnotes and a full bibliography. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. B. Almon emeritus, University of Alberta

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