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Hoo-Doo Cowboys and Bronze Buckaroos : Conceptions of the African American West

By: Johnson, Michael K.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Margaret Walker Alexander Series in African American Studies: Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2014Description: 1 online resource (296 p.).ISBN: 9781626740013.Subject(s): African Americans -- West (U.S.) -- History | African Americans -- West (U.S.) -- Intellectual life | African Americans in popular culture | American literature -- African American authors -- History and criticism | American literature -- West (U.S.) -- History and criticism | Frontier and pioneer life in literature | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Ethnic Studies / African American Studies | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Popular CultureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Hoo-Doo Cowboys and Bronze Buckaroos : Conceptions of the African American WestDDC classification: 810.9 | 810.9/896073 | 810.9896073 LOC classification: PS153.N5Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; INTRODUCTION; 1. Performing (in) the African American West: Minstrel Shows, Brass Bands, Hoo-Doo Cowboys, and Other Musical Tricksters; 2. "Try to Refrain from That Desire": Self-Control and Violent Passion in Oscar Micheaux's African American Western; 3. "This Strange White World": Race and Place in Era Bell Thompson's American Daughter and Rose Gordon's Newspaper Writing; 4. Cowboys, Cooks, and Comics: African American Characters in Westerns of the 1930s; 5. Oscar Micheaux, The Exile, and the Black Western Race Film
6. Sammy Davis Jr., Woody Strode, and the Black Westerner of the Civil Rights Era7. Looking at the Big Picture: Percival Everett's Western Fiction; 8. The Post-Soul Cowboy on the Science Fiction Frontier; CONCLUSION THE D Is Silent; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: Hoo-Doo Cowboys and Bronze Buckaroos undertakes an interdisciplinary exploration of the African American West through close readings of texts from a variety of media. This approach allows for both an in-depth analysis of individual texts and a discussion of material often left out or underrepresented in studies focused only on traditional literary material. The book engages heretofore unexamined writing by Rose Gordon, who wrote for local Montana newspapers rather than for a national audience; memoirs and letters of musicians, performers, and singers (such as W. C. Handy and Taylor Gordon), who lived in or wrote about touring the American West; the novels and films of Oscar Micheaux; black-cast westerns starring Herb Jeffries; largely unappreciated and unexamined episodes from the "golden age of western television" that feature African American actors; film and television westerns that use science fiction settings to imagine a "postracial" or "postsoul" frontier; Percival Everett's fiction addressing contemporary black western experience; and movies as recent as Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained. Despite recent interest in the history of the African American West, we know very little about how the African American past in the West has been depicted in a full range of imaginative forms. Hoo-Doo Cowboys and Bronze Buckaroos advances our discovery of how the African American West has been experienced, imagined, portrayed, and performed.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS153.N5 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1181949 Available EBL1181949

Cover; CONTENTS; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; INTRODUCTION; 1. Performing (in) the African American West: Minstrel Shows, Brass Bands, Hoo-Doo Cowboys, and Other Musical Tricksters; 2. "Try to Refrain from That Desire": Self-Control and Violent Passion in Oscar Micheaux's African American Western; 3. "This Strange White World": Race and Place in Era Bell Thompson's American Daughter and Rose Gordon's Newspaper Writing; 4. Cowboys, Cooks, and Comics: African American Characters in Westerns of the 1930s; 5. Oscar Micheaux, The Exile, and the Black Western Race Film

6. Sammy Davis Jr., Woody Strode, and the Black Westerner of the Civil Rights Era7. Looking at the Big Picture: Percival Everett's Western Fiction; 8. The Post-Soul Cowboy on the Science Fiction Frontier; CONCLUSION THE D Is Silent; NOTES; BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

Hoo-Doo Cowboys and Bronze Buckaroos undertakes an interdisciplinary exploration of the African American West through close readings of texts from a variety of media. This approach allows for both an in-depth analysis of individual texts and a discussion of material often left out or underrepresented in studies focused only on traditional literary material. The book engages heretofore unexamined writing by Rose Gordon, who wrote for local Montana newspapers rather than for a national audience; memoirs and letters of musicians, performers, and singers (such as W. C. Handy and Taylor Gordon), who lived in or wrote about touring the American West; the novels and films of Oscar Micheaux; black-cast westerns starring Herb Jeffries; largely unappreciated and unexamined episodes from the "golden age of western television" that feature African American actors; film and television westerns that use science fiction settings to imagine a "postracial" or "postsoul" frontier; Percival Everett's fiction addressing contemporary black western experience; and movies as recent as Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained. Despite recent interest in the history of the African American West, we know very little about how the African American past in the West has been depicted in a full range of imaginative forms. Hoo-Doo Cowboys and Bronze Buckaroos advances our discovery of how the African American West has been experienced, imagined, portrayed, and performed.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Analyzing the African American West in literature and film, Johnson (Univ. of Maine, Farmington) considers ways in which "African Americans have been present at every frontier" and participated by way of civic engagement and entertainment. Drawing fascinating evidence from newspaper writings by Rose Gordon in Montana, Era Bell Thompson's autobiography American Daughter (1946), and more widely distributed memoirs by W. C. Handy and Taylor Gordon, Johnson characterizes African American responses to western landscapes and living. Johnson brings other disciplines to the discussion: he engages W. E. B. Du Bois's theory of "double consciousness" alongside Sigmund Freud's portrayals of "the uncanny" and the "tendentious joke" to describe modes of progressive representation in western idioms. Strong close readings of film work by director Oscar Micheaux and actor Herb Jeffries arrive alongside analyses of television episodes from the 1960s, starring Sammy Davis Jr. (The Rifleman) and Woody Strode (Rawhide). Compelling discussions of latter-day stories by Percival Everett and contemporary science fiction offerings The Book of Eli and Firefox arrive without careful attention to particularities of 21st-century practices of media consumption. A brief coda considers Django Unchained and ways in which upsetting the "frontier myth's racial categorization of savagery and civilization and the reversal of the trope of regenerative violence" remain a staple of the African American Western. --Thomas F. DeFrantz, Duke University

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