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Abolitionists remember : antislavery autobiographies & the unfinished work of emancipation / Julie Roy Jeffrey.

By: Jeffrey, Julie Roy.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2008Description: 1 online resource (xii, 337 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780807837283; 0807837288; 9781469602271; 146960227X.Subject(s): Abolitionists -- United States -- Biography | African American abolitionists -- Biography | Fugitive slaves -- United States -- Biography | Autobiography | Autobiography -- African American authors | Slaves -- Emancipation -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Abolitionists remember.DDC classification: 326/.8092/2 | B LOC classification: E449 | .J455 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The dissolution of the antislavery societies -- The first recollections -- Fugitives as part of abolitionist history -- Reunions -- "Nigger thieves" : whites and the Underground Railroad -- Defending the past : the 1880s -- The remembrance is like a dream : reminiscences of the 1890s -- Afterword.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: Jeffrey examines the autobiographical writings of former abolitionists such as Laura Haviland, Frederick Douglass, Parker Pillsbury, and Samuel J. May, revealing that they wrote not only to counter the popular image of themselves as fanatics, but also to remind readers of the harsh reality of slavery and to advocate equal rights for African Americans in an era of growing racism, Jim Crow, and the Ku Klux Klan. --from publisher description.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E449 .J455 2008 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807837283_Jeffrey Available ocn606149985

Includes bibliographical references (pages 303-323) and index.

The dissolution of the antislavery societies -- The first recollections -- Fugitives as part of abolitionist history -- Reunions -- "Nigger thieves" : whites and the Underground Railroad -- Defending the past : the 1880s -- The remembrance is like a dream : reminiscences of the 1890s -- Afterword.

Jeffrey examines the autobiographical writings of former abolitionists such as Laura Haviland, Frederick Douglass, Parker Pillsbury, and Samuel J. May, revealing that they wrote not only to counter the popular image of themselves as fanatics, but also to remind readers of the harsh reality of slavery and to advocate equal rights for African Americans in an era of growing racism, Jim Crow, and the Ku Klux Klan. --from publisher description.

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Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

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Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Scholarship on the politics of Civil War-era memory has been a growth industry over the past two decades. Jeffrey's welcome work focuses on abolitionists who wrote memoirs and reminiscences and participated in antislavery reunions and conventions between 1865 and 1900. The book ranges widely, but focuses on such well-known abolitionist figures as Samuel J. May, William Still, Levi Coffin, Laura S. Haviland, George W. Julian, Jane Gray Swisshelm, and Frederick Douglass, as well as men and women who have remained obscure, even to scholars, such as Lucy N. Coleman, William Webb, Calvin Fairbank, and Aaron M. Powell. Jeffrey (Goucher College) argues that during and after Reconstruction, these old abolitionists were acutely aware of the reaction, in both the North and the South, that threatened African American rights, and used their autobiographies to try to remind readers of the evils of slavery and the need to struggle against its legacies. Utilizing reviews, book contracts, and correspondence with publishers as well as a survey of the contemporary press, Jeffrey finds that abolitionists struggled against growing racism and Old South/"Lost Cause" romanticism. This will not be the last word on the subject, but it is a marvelous starting point. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. T. D. Hamm Earlham College

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