Jeremiah's scribes : creating sermon literature in Puritan New England / Meredith Marie Neuman.

By: Neuman, Meredith MarieMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksMaterial texts: Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, ©2013Description: 1 online resource (x, 265 pages :) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780812208726; 0812208722Subject(s): Sermons, American -- New England -- History and criticism | Puritans -- Religious life -- New EnglandAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Jeremiah's scribes.DDC classification: 252/.0590974 LOC classification: PS153.P87 | N48 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS153.P87 N48 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt3fhs3v Available ocn859160747

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Based on the detailed archival work of Neuman (English, Clark Univ.), this original and rewarding study restores for contemporary readers the vital, dialogic nature of Puritan sermonizing in New England culture. As the lifeblood of "sermon culture"--an intertextual, interpretive network of exegetical practices, both written and oral, clerical and laic--the sermon is not only too prevalent (Neuman cites one scholar who estimates that a saint would have heard some 15,000 hours of sermonizing in a lifetime) but, in Neuman's assessment, too dynamic to ignore. Particularly noteworthy are the authors' efforts to recapture the orality--and the aurality--of these sermons through her insightful analysis of the work of Puritan notetakers. Such auditors were not mere recorders but rather active interpreters, essential to the process by which orations were understood, transcribed, and circulated, and Neuman demonstrates their centrality to the responsive "listening acts of the laity" that characterized the Puritan undertaking. Neuman's study challenges those who would dismiss Puritan theology or praxis as irretrievably antiquated; she depicts, in impressively readable style, a collaborative, vibrant material culture in which the actual sermon played multiple--and not necessarily authoritative--roles. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. A. T. Hale University of Puget Sound

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Meredith Marie Neuman is Associate Professor of English at Clark University.

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