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The making of Black Detroit in the age of Henry Ford / Beth Tompkins Bates.

By: Bates, Beth Tompkins.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2012Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 343 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780807837450; 0807837458; 9781469601571; 1469601575.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Making of Black Detroit in the age of Henry Ford.DDC classification: 305.896/077434 LOC classification: F574.D49 | N428 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
With the wind at their backs : migration to Detroit -- Henry Ford ushers in a new era for Black workers -- The politics of inclusion and the construction of a new Detroit -- Drawing the color line in housing, 1915-1930 -- The politics of unemployment in depression-era Detroit, 1927-1931 -- Henry Ford at a crossroads : Inkster and the Ford Hunger March -- Behind the mask of civility: Black politics in Detroit, 1932-1935 -- Charting a new course for Black workers -- Black workers change tactics, 1937-1941.
Summary: In the 1920s, Henry Ford hired thousands of African American men for his open-shop system of auto manufacturing. This move was a rejection of the notion that better jobs were for white men only. This book explains how black Detroiters, newly arrived from the South, seized the economic opportunities offered by Ford in the hope of gaining greater economic security. As these workers came to realize that Ford's anti-union 'American Plan' did not allow them full access to the American Dream, their loyalty eroded, and they sought empowerment by pursuing a broad activist agenda.
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F574.D49 J515 2015 Metropolitan Jews : F574.D49 M514 2010 Mexican women and the other side of immigration : F574.D49 N422 2013 The 1967 Detroit riots / F574.D49 N428 2012 The making of Black Detroit in the age of Henry Ford / F574.D49 N43345 2013 Detroit : F574.G7 R63 2013 A city within a city : F574.H23 K386 2010 Challenge accepted :

Includes bibliographical references and index.

With the wind at their backs : migration to Detroit -- Henry Ford ushers in a new era for Black workers -- The politics of inclusion and the construction of a new Detroit -- Drawing the color line in housing, 1915-1930 -- The politics of unemployment in depression-era Detroit, 1927-1931 -- Henry Ford at a crossroads : Inkster and the Ford Hunger March -- Behind the mask of civility: Black politics in Detroit, 1932-1935 -- Charting a new course for Black workers -- Black workers change tactics, 1937-1941.

Print version record.

In the 1920s, Henry Ford hired thousands of African American men for his open-shop system of auto manufacturing. This move was a rejection of the notion that better jobs were for white men only. This book explains how black Detroiters, newly arrived from the South, seized the economic opportunities offered by Ford in the hope of gaining greater economic security. As these workers came to realize that Ford's anti-union 'American Plan' did not allow them full access to the American Dream, their loyalty eroded, and they sought empowerment by pursuing a broad activist agenda.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Bates's most recent work is a valuable addition to existing scholarship by Thomas Sugrue (e.g., The Origins of the Urban Crisis, CH, Jun'97, 34-5995), Richard Thomas, and others about the history of Detroit, black Detroiters, and the Ford Motor Company. The author's chronological focus on the 1920s and early 1930s fills the existing void in academic discourse about Detroit. This book is about African American Ford workers' shift from being anti-union workers loyal to the company to pro-union workers. Bates (emer., Wayne State Univ.) suggests that in addition to poor residential and working conditions and the Great Depression, Frank Murphy's campaign for judge in 1923 was a significant factor in the city's history. She argues that the candidate symbolized an attempt to overturn autocracy and social control by the upper class. When blacks helped Murphy's victory, they were no longer followers and at the mercy of the industry, but were decision makers in the city. While Bates recognizes Henry Ford's contribution to Detroit's African American community, she also correctly elaborates on the demise of Ford's dominance and so-called "Ford mules" and high rates of workers' sickness. Integrating numerous significant primary sources and written in jargon-free language, this book is suitable for undergraduates and above. Summing Up: Recommended. All academic levels/libraries. Y. Kiuchi Michigan State University

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