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Talk with you like a woman : African American women, justice, and reform in New York, 1890-1935 / Cheryl D. Hicks.

By: Hicks, Cheryl D, 1971- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Gender & American culture: Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2010Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 372 pages) : illustrations, portraits.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780807882320; 0807882321; 9781469603759; 1469603756.Subject(s): African American women -- Employment -- New York (State) -- New York | African American women -- New York (State) -- New York -- Social conditions -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Talk with you like a woman.DDC classification: 305.48/8960730747 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
To live a fuller and freer life : black women migrants' expectations and New York's urban realities, 1890-1927 -- The only one that would be interested in me : police brutality, black women's protection, and the New York Race Riot of 1900 -- I want to save these girls : single black women and their protectors, 1895-1911 -- Colored women of hard and vicious character : respectability, domesticity, and crime, 1893-1933 -- Tragedy of the colored girl in court : the National Urban League and New York's Women's Court, 1911-1931 -- In danger of becoming morally depraved : single black women, working-class black families, and New York State's Wayward Minor Laws, 1917-1928 -- A rather bright and good-looking colored girl : black women's sexuality, "harmful intimacy," and attempts to regulate desire, 1917-1928 -- I don't live on my sister, I living of myself : parole, gender, and black families, 1905-1935 -- She would be better off in the South : sending women on parole to their southern kin, 1920-1935 -- Conclusion: thank god I am independent one more time.
Summary: With this book, Cheryl Hicks brings to light the voices and viewpoints of black working-class women, especially southern migrants, who were the subjects of urban and penal reform in early twentieth-century New York. In need of support as they navigated the discriminatory labor and housing markets and contended with poverty, maternity, and domestic violence, black women instead found themselves subject to hostility from black leaders, urban reformers, and the police. Through their actions as well as their words, black working-class women challenged prevailing views regarding black women and mor.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F128.9.N4 H53 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807882320_Hicks Available ocn698110362

Includes bibliographical references (pages 335-354) and index.

To live a fuller and freer life : black women migrants' expectations and New York's urban realities, 1890-1927 -- The only one that would be interested in me : police brutality, black women's protection, and the New York Race Riot of 1900 -- I want to save these girls : single black women and their protectors, 1895-1911 -- Colored women of hard and vicious character : respectability, domesticity, and crime, 1893-1933 -- Tragedy of the colored girl in court : the National Urban League and New York's Women's Court, 1911-1931 -- In danger of becoming morally depraved : single black women, working-class black families, and New York State's Wayward Minor Laws, 1917-1928 -- A rather bright and good-looking colored girl : black women's sexuality, "harmful intimacy," and attempts to regulate desire, 1917-1928 -- I don't live on my sister, I living of myself : parole, gender, and black families, 1905-1935 -- She would be better off in the South : sending women on parole to their southern kin, 1920-1935 -- Conclusion: thank god I am independent one more time.

With this book, Cheryl Hicks brings to light the voices and viewpoints of black working-class women, especially southern migrants, who were the subjects of urban and penal reform in early twentieth-century New York. In need of support as they navigated the discriminatory labor and housing markets and contended with poverty, maternity, and domestic violence, black women instead found themselves subject to hostility from black leaders, urban reformers, and the police. Through their actions as well as their words, black working-class women challenged prevailing views regarding black women and mor.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Hicks brings readers the perspectives of black working-class women, especially those who migrated from the South, and their experiences of urban life, especially in New York. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

In this thorough study of black women who lived under extremely difficult socioeconomic circumstances in New York City during the Progressive Era and into the 1930s, Hicks (Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte) offers a vivid view into the struggles for respectability as defined by the middle-class values of their time. She gives voice to women who have not been studied thus far, because scholars of African American history have focused their work on the racial uplift movement of successful black middle-class women, such as Anna Julia Cooper and Mary Church Terrell. Hicks uses Lucy Cox, a working-class woman who was self-educated but wrongfully incarcerated for prostitution, and traces her life and struggles to find a respectable space and forum to speak and write about her own and others' experiences as working-class black women in a racist, sexist society that also discriminated based on class. Hicks juxtaposes the two worlds and questions the ability of black middle-class women in the uplift movement to be representative of all black women. She gives Cox the final word by emphasizing her aim to speak for herself and tell her story independently from what others deemed acceptable. Summing Up: Recommended. Undergraduate and graduate studies. C. Warren Empire State College

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