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One world, big screen : Hollywood, the Allies, and World War II / M. Todd Bennett.

By: Bennett, M. Todd.
Contributor(s): Project Muse.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2012. 2013)Description: 1 online resource (384 p.).ISBN: 9781469601465 (electronic bk.); 146960146X (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Motion pictures -- Political aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Motion pictures -- United States -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1939-1945 -- Motion pictures and the warDDC classification: 791.43/6584053 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- The "magic bullet": Hollywood, Washington, and the moviegoing public -- "Pro-British-American war preachers": internationalism at the movies, 1939-1941 -- One world, big screen: the United Nations and American horizons -- Kissing cousins: how Anglo-American relations became "special" -- Courting Uncle Joe: the theatrics of Soviet-American matrimony -- Negotiating the color divide: race and U.S. paternalism toward China -- Conclusion.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D743.23 .B46 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807837467_Bennett Available ocn830023203

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- The "magic bullet": Hollywood, Washington, and the moviegoing public -- "Pro-British-American war preachers": internationalism at the movies, 1939-1941 -- One world, big screen: the United Nations and American horizons -- Kissing cousins: how Anglo-American relations became "special" -- Courting Uncle Joe: the theatrics of Soviet-American matrimony -- Negotiating the color divide: race and U.S. paternalism toward China -- Conclusion.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Between 1939 and 1945, US public opinion shifted from isolationism to cosmopolitanism, seeing the US as part of a progressive global community called the United Nations. Bennett (East Carolina Univ.) analyzes the process of this transformation, primarily through an examination of film propaganda. For example, when the British needed to move US public opinion from isolation to intervention, they found a willing ally in the Warner Bros. studios, which not only made anti-Nazi and pro-Allies films, but periodically acted as a conduit for official British publicity to the US market. The US Office of War Information (OWI) tried to persuade Hollywood to produce films that would help mold an image of the US as a leader in a UN fight against fascism. Bennett examines how the OWI guided Hollywood to reinterpret the Soviet Union from the prewar Bolshevik bogeyman into the land ruled by a beneficent "Uncle Joe" Stalin, and how the communist utopia was now a vital part of this United Nations. As Bennett adroitly notes, propaganda works most effectively when it corresponds to reality, or at least some perception of reality. A must read for those interested in wartime propaganda and diplomacy. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. F. Krome University of Cincinnati--Clermont College

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