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Making sense of war : the Second World War and the fate of the Bolshevik Revolution / Amir Weiner.

By: Weiner, Amir.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Princeton, N.J. ; Chichester : Princeton University Press, 2002Description: 1 online resource (432 p.) : ill., maps.ISBN: 9781400840854 (electronic bk.); 1400840856 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): World War, 1939-1945 -- Social aspects -- Soviet Union | World War, 1939-1945 -- Soviet Union | World War, 1939-1945 -- Soviet Union -- Psychological aspects | Communism -- Soviet Union -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Making sense of war.DDC classification: 940.5310947 LOC classification: D744.55 | .W45 2002Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: Annotation InMaking Sense of War,Amir Weiner reconceptualizes the entire historical experience of the Soviet Union from a new perspective, that of World War II. Breaking with the conventional interpretation that views World War II as a post-revolutionary addendum, Weiner situates this event at the crux of the development of the Soviet--not just the Stalinist--system. Through a richly detailed look at Soviet society as a whole, and at one Ukrainian region in particular, the author shows how World War II came to define the ways in which members of the political elite as well as ordinary citizens viewed the world and acted upon their beliefs and ideologies.The book explores the creation of the myth of the war against the historiography of modern schemes for social engineering, the Holocaust, ethnic deportations, collaboration, and postwar settlements. For communist true believers, World War II was the purgatory of the revolution, the final cleansing of Soviet society of the remaining elusive "human weeds" who intruded upon socialist harmony, and it brought the polity to the brink of communism. Those ridden with doubts turned to the war as a redemption for past wrongs of the regime, while others hoped it would be the death blow to an evil enterprise. For all, it was the Armageddon of the Bolshevik Revolution. The result of Weiner's inquiry is a bold, compelling new picture of a Soviet Union both reinforced and enfeebled by the experience of total war.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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D744.55 .W45 2002 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7t28v Available ocn778483993

Originally published: 2000.

Description based on print version record.

Annotation InMaking Sense of War,Amir Weiner reconceptualizes the entire historical experience of the Soviet Union from a new perspective, that of World War II. Breaking with the conventional interpretation that views World War II as a post-revolutionary addendum, Weiner situates this event at the crux of the development of the Soviet--not just the Stalinist--system. Through a richly detailed look at Soviet society as a whole, and at one Ukrainian region in particular, the author shows how World War II came to define the ways in which members of the political elite as well as ordinary citizens viewed the world and acted upon their beliefs and ideologies.The book explores the creation of the myth of the war against the historiography of modern schemes for social engineering, the Holocaust, ethnic deportations, collaboration, and postwar settlements. For communist true believers, World War II was the purgatory of the revolution, the final cleansing of Soviet society of the remaining elusive "human weeds" who intruded upon socialist harmony, and it brought the polity to the brink of communism. Those ridden with doubts turned to the war as a redemption for past wrongs of the regime, while others hoped it would be the death blow to an evil enterprise. For all, it was the Armageddon of the Bolshevik Revolution. The result of Weiner's inquiry is a bold, compelling new picture of a Soviet Union both reinforced and enfeebled by the experience of total war.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book endeavors to assess the cultural, political, and spiritual impact of WWII on the Soviet Union. The agenda is an ambitious one, and the author has not completely mastered it. Weiner deals with the concrete to capture the ephemeral, cleaving too closely to the kind of conclusions that the Soviets would have wanted a historian to make. The basic underpinning theses are that the USSR was a normal society; that the war must be seen as a continuation of the Bolshevik Revolution; and that the war created new social substrata based on partisan and battle line camaraderie. To argue the case, the author uses a broad spectrum of sources--literature, newspaper accounts, diaries, court records, and official documents. However, forgetting the country's rocky history, Weiner overemphasizes the normality of the USSR, which drives him to the conclusion that the war enhanced Soviet stability. Not enough attention is paid to those forces that led to the megalith's disintegration only 40 years after their victory over Nazism. The work is well footnoted, has an impressive bibliography, and contains a good index. Recommended for college, especially graduate, level libraries. A. Ezergailis Ithaca College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Amir Weiner is Assistant Professor of History at Stanford University.

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