Cities of the dead : contesting the memory of the Civil War in the South, 1865-1914 / by William A. Blair.

By: Blair, William AlanMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksCivil War America (Series): Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2004Description: 1 online resource (xii, 250 p.)ISBN: 0807876232 (electronic bk.); 9780807876237 (electronic bk.); 9781469603582 (electronic bk.); 1469603586 (electronic bk.); 9780807828960 (alk. paper); 0807828963 (alk. paper)Subject(s): Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) | Memorials -- Political aspects -- Southern States -- History | Power (Social sciences) -- Southern States -- History | Political culture -- Southern States -- History | Group identity -- Southern States -- History | African Americans -- Southern States -- Anniversaries, etc | Southern States -- Politics and government -- 1865-1950 | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Monuments | Southern States -- Race relations | United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- InfluenceAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Cities of the dead.DDC classification: 973.7/6 LOC classification: F215 | .B625 2004Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: Exploring the history of Civil War commemorations from both sides of the color line, William Blair places the development of memorial holidays and Emancipation Day celebrations in the context of Reconstruction politics and race relations in the South. His examination demonstrates that the politics of commemoration remain contentious.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Fiction notes: Click to open in new window
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F215 .B625 2004 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807876237_Blair Available ocm62157959

Includes bibliographical references (p. [227]-236) and index.

Description based on print version record.

Exploring the history of Civil War commemorations from both sides of the color line, William Blair places the development of memorial holidays and Emancipation Day celebrations in the context of Reconstruction politics and race relations in the South. His examination demonstrates that the politics of commemoration remain contentious.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Blair (Pennsylvania State Univ.) adds to a growing literature on public commemorations with this lucid analysis of how Confederate and Union Memorial Days and African American Emancipation Days were used by various racial, sectional, and political constituencies in the post-emancipation South. By tracing these invented traditions and the strong reactions they provoked over the 50 years following the Civil War, Blair demonstrates that they were not mere festive occasions but key elements of political discourse. After an opening chapter on antebellum commemorative culture, Blair traces the evolution of Freedom Days and Memorial Days from 1865 to 1915, with one chapter paying notable attention to the gendered messages they embodied. A concluding chapter on Arlington National Cemetery neatly illustrates the book's argument about the intersection of sectional and national politics within commemorative culture. The study is limited by its geographical focus (mainly Virginia), the narrow range of commemorations discussed, and the concentration primarily on their political functions. Blair's approach, however, allows him to explore his material deeply and to surpass more broadly defined studies to develop understanding of the complex roles commemorations played at the local and regional levels in struggles for political power. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. M. Kachun Western Michigan University

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.