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Imperialism and Jewish Society : 200 B.C.E. to 640 C.E. / Seth Schwartz.

By: Schwartz, Seth.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Jews, Christians, and Muslims from the ancient to the modern world: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2001Description: 1 online resource (320 p.).ISBN: 9781400824854 (electronic bk.); 1400824850 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Jews -- History -- 168 B.C.-135 A.D | Jews -- History -- 70-638 | Judaism -- History -- Post-exilic period, 586 B.C.-210 A.D | Jews -- Civilization -- Greek influences | Palestine -- History -- To 70 A.DAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Imperialism and Jewish Society.DDC classification: 933 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; ABBREVIATIONS; Introduction; PART I: THE JEWS OF PALESTINE TO 70 C.E.; PART II: JEWS IN PALESTINE FROM 135 TO 350; PART III: SYNAGOGUE AND COMMUNITY FROM 350 TO 640; Conclusion; SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX.
Summary: This provocative new history of Palestinian Jewish society in antiquity marks the first comprehensive effort to gauge the effects of imperial domination on this people. Probing more than eight centuries of Persian, Greek, and Roman rule, Seth Schwartz reaches some startling conclusions--foremost among them that the Christianization of the Roman Empire generated the most fundamental features of medieval and modern Jewish life. Schwartz begins by arguing that the distinctiveness of Judaism in the Persian, Hellenistic, and early Roman periods was the product of generally prevailing imperial tolera.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS121.7 .S39 2001 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7srjb Available ocn437140503

This provocative new history of Palestinian Jewish society in antiquity marks the first comprehensive effort to gauge the effects of imperial domination on this people. Probing more than eight centuries of Persian, Greek, and Roman rule, Seth Schwartz reaches some startling conclusions--foremost among them that the Christianization of the Roman Empire generated the most fundamental features of medieval and modern Jewish life. Schwartz begins by arguing that the distinctiveness of Judaism in the Persian, Hellenistic, and early Roman periods was the product of generally prevailing imperial tolera.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [293]-315) and index.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; ABBREVIATIONS; Introduction; PART I: THE JEWS OF PALESTINE TO 70 C.E.; PART II: JEWS IN PALESTINE FROM 135 TO 350; PART III: SYNAGOGUE AND COMMUNITY FROM 350 TO 640; Conclusion; SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY; INDEX.

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Schwartz (history, Jewish Theological Seminary) is a leading expert on the Jews in the Roman Empire. Using scholarly publications, he has produced a new synthesis that will provoke much debate among scholars. He asks whether Jews were an identifiable and self-conscious group in antiquity, particularly after the destruction of the Temple in 70 CE. Schwartz doubts it, arguing that the rabbis of the second to sixth centuries had little authority, and that Hellenism was a powerful cultural and religious influence. His thesis is that outside influences shaped Jewish institutions and sense of identity. During a first period, 539 BCE to 70 CE, indirect imperial rule (Persian, Greek, and Roman) allowed for the centrality of Temple and Torah. In a second period of direct Roman rule from 135 CE to 350, Judaism was "shattered," and religious syncretisms emerged. After the fourth century, triumphant Christians treated the Jews as a separate people, forcing a revival of Judaism centered on synagogue and Torah. Other scholars will object that Jewish institutions had more independent strength and dynamism, but Schwartz's carefully argued positions must be taken seriously. Graduate students and faculty. B. Weinstein emeritus, Howard University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Seth Schwartz is the Gerson D. Cohen Professor of History at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York. He is the author of Josephus and Judaean Politics and coauthor, with Roger Bagnall, Alan Cameron, and Klaas Worp, of Consuls of the Later Roman Empire .

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