Julian of Norwich, theologian / Denys Turner.

By: Turner, Denys, 1942-Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, ©2011Description: 1 online resource (xxvi, 262 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300164688; 0300164688; 1283096145; 9781283096140Subject(s): Sin -- Christianity | Salvation -- ChristianityAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Julian of Norwich, theologian.DDC classification: 230/.2092 LOC classification: BV4832.3.J863 | T87 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
A note on Julian's text -- Providence and sin -- Sin and salvation -- Conclusion : Julian's soteriology.
Summary: For centuries readers have comfortably accepted Julian of Norwich as simply a mystic. In this astute book, Denys Turner offers a new interpretation of Julian and the significance of her work. Turner argues that this fourteenth-century thinker's sophisticated approach to theological questions places her legitimately within the pantheon of other great medieval theologians, including Thomas Aquinas, Bernard of Clairvaux, and Bonaventure. Julian wrote but one work in two versions, a Short Text recording the series of visions of Jesus Christ she experienced while suffering a near-fatal illness, and a much expanded Long Text exploring the theological meaning of the ""showings"" some twenty years later. Turner addresses the apparent conflict between the two sources of Julians theology: on the one hand, her personal revelation of Gods omnipotent love, and on the other, the Churchs teachings on and her own witnessing of evil in the world that deserves punishment, even eternal punishment. Offering a fresh and elegant account of Julians response to this conflict;one that reveals its nuances, systematic character, and originalitythis book marks a new stage in the century-long rediscovery of one of the English languages greatest theological thinkers.
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BV4832.3.J863 T87 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1npnmz Available ocn719383031

Includes bibliographical references and index.

A note on Julian's text -- Providence and sin -- Sin and salvation -- Conclusion : Julian's soteriology.

Print version record.

For centuries readers have comfortably accepted Julian of Norwich as simply a mystic. In this astute book, Denys Turner offers a new interpretation of Julian and the significance of her work. Turner argues that this fourteenth-century thinker's sophisticated approach to theological questions places her legitimately within the pantheon of other great medieval theologians, including Thomas Aquinas, Bernard of Clairvaux, and Bonaventure. Julian wrote but one work in two versions, a Short Text recording the series of visions of Jesus Christ she experienced while suffering a near-fatal illness, and a much expanded Long Text exploring the theological meaning of the ""showings"" some twenty years later. Turner addresses the apparent conflict between the two sources of Julians theology: on the one hand, her personal revelation of Gods omnipotent love, and on the other, the Churchs teachings on and her own witnessing of evil in the world that deserves punishment, even eternal punishment. Offering a fresh and elegant account of Julians response to this conflict;one that reveals its nuances, systematic character, and originalitythis book marks a new stage in the century-long rediscovery of one of the English languages greatest theological thinkers.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Turner (historical theology, Yale Divinity Sch.; Faith, Reason and the Existence of God) sets out to argue that 14th-century English mystic Julian of Norwich not only was witness to divine visions but interpreted those visions in a theologically sophisticated manner, and this put her in the same category as Thomas Aquinas and Bernard of Clairvaux. Turner focuses on the contradictions within Julian's visions, or "shewings," and how Julian made sense of them, e.g., by asserting that sin has no "substance" and is "nought" to God in spite of her empirical knowledge that sin and evil do indeed exist and have tangible consequences. Turner systematically explains terms that Julian uses, such as "behovely" ("fitting"), essential to understanding Julian's insights. Elsewhere, Turner lays out then rules against arguments that could be used to question Julian's orthodoxy. Readers are left with a fresh interpretation of both Julian's shewings and of sin, redemption, and God's love for humanity. VERDICT This fascinating and quietly powerful academic work assumes that the reader is already familiar with the writings of Julian of Norwich. Recommended for serious college and university students and their professors as well as theologians who focus on this era.-Jennifer Stout, Cumberland Univ. Lib., Lebanon, TN (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Few medieval writers are as widely read outside the academy as Julian of Norwich, and few have influenced such a wide range of Christians. Too often, readers understand "showings" to be direct accounts of God's revelation to Julian, a medieval English solitary. Turner (Yale), the author of The Darkness of God: Negativity in Christian Mysticism (CH, Feb'96, 33-3268), uses his expertise in both mysticism and medieval theology to correct what he believes to be the more common errors and misunderstandings of Julian and her texts. In Turner's reading, Julian was not a champion of direct mediation of God's presence outside the boundaries of church authority. Instead, Julian's interpretations of her showings emerged over a long period, and her expositions were clearly shaped and informed by teachings of the Catholic magisterium. Readers interested in Julian, medieval theology, and the relationship between theology and spirituality will find this book helpful. At times, it references more-complicated theological debates wherein additional theological knowledge would be helpful. However, most sections should be accessible to nonspecialists. This volume undoubtedly will influence further scholarship and discussions about Julian and her theology. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates through researchers/faculty. A. W. Klink Duke University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Denys Turner is Horace Tracy Pitkin Professor of Historical Theology, Yale University. He lives in New Haven, CT, and in Birmingham, UK.

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