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Law's environment : how the law shapes the places we live / John Copeland Nagle.

By: Nagle, John Copeland, 1960-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New Haven [Conn.] : Yale University Press, ©2010Description: 1 online resource (xiii, 298 pages :) : maps.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300162912; 030016291X.Subject(s): Environmental law | Law -- Environmental aspects | Environmental law -- United States -- Case studiesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Law's environment.DDC classification: 344.04/6 LOC classification: K3585 | .N34 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The end of the earth : Adak Island, Alaska, -- The mayor's oversized flyswatter : Colton, California, -- Heaven or hell? : the badlands of Western North Dakota -- River enigma : the Susquehanna River -- Lights out : Alamogordo, New Mexico.
Summary: John Copeland Nagle shows how our reliance on environmental law affects the natural environment through an examination of five diverse places in the American landscape: Alaska's Adak Island the Susquehanna River; Colton in California's Inland Empire Theodore Roosevelt National Park; and Alamogordo in New Mexico.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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K3585 .N34 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt1npnpx Available ocn808346542

Includes bibliographical references (pages 253-283) and index.

The end of the earth : Adak Island, Alaska, -- The mayor's oversized flyswatter : Colton, California, -- Heaven or hell? : the badlands of Western North Dakota -- River enigma : the Susquehanna River -- Lights out : Alamogordo, New Mexico.

John Copeland Nagle shows how our reliance on environmental law affects the natural environment through an examination of five diverse places in the American landscape: Alaska's Adak Island the Susquehanna River; Colton in California's Inland Empire Theodore Roosevelt National Park; and Alamogordo in New Mexico.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Nagle (Univ. of Notre Dame Law School) has written an important book on environmental law that should be of great interest to students and scholars of law and society. Through in-depth case studies of five low-profile locations, Nagle demonstrates both the perils and promise of the law as a change agent. In doing so, he makes important contributions to environmental law and law and society scholarship. First, he convincingly argues for studies of environmental law that are focused less on case law and judges and more on activists, citizens, and nonjudicial public officials, as most of the conflict over the law in his cases occurred outside formal litigation. Second, he argues for more flexibility in environmental law enforcement, demonstrating that important but competing values are embedded in the law and the wide range of actors who encounter the law. Finally, he argues that his multiple, in-depth, case study method is important in order to demonstrate the full complexity of the effects of the law on a place's environment, and even non-environmental law, unlike approaches that study the effects of one law on multiple locations. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. A. Pierceson University of Illinois at Springfield

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