Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Proudly we can be Africans : Black Americans and Africa, 1935-1961 / James H. Meriwether.

By: Meriwether, James Hunter, 1963-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture: Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2002Description: 1 online resource (xi, 336 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0807860417 (electronic bk.); 9780807860410 (electronic bk.); 9781469606064 (electronic bk.); 1469606062 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): African Americans -- Relations with Africans | African Americans -- Race identity | African Americans -- Intellectual life -- 20th century | United States -- Relations -- Africa | Africa -- Relations -- United States | Africa -- Politics and government -- 20th century | Africa -- Social conditions -- 20th century | Blacks -- Civil rights -- Africa -- History -- 20th century | Civil rights movements -- Africa -- History -- 20th centuryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Proudly we can be Africans.DDC classification: 305.896/073 LOC classification: E185.61 | .M56 2002Other classification: 15.85 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Ethiopia : the Italo-Ethiopian War and reconceptualizing contemporary Africa, 1935-1936 -- In world war and cold war : configuring anticolonialism and internationalism, 1941-1950 -- South Africa : apartheid and nonviolent resistance, 1948-1953 -- Kenya : the Mau Mau and revolutionary violence, 1952-1956 -- Ghana : African independence, 1957-1958 -- The year of Africa : lows, highs, and corners, 1960 -- Congo ; independence, Black nationalism, leftism, and splintering, 1960-1961.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: In the mid-20th century nations across Africa fought for their independence from colonial forces. By examining black Americans' attitudes toward and responses to these struggles, this work probes the shifting meaning of Africa in the intellectual, political and social lives of African Americans.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.61 .M56 2002 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807860410_Meriwether Available ocm52384146

Includes bibliographical references (pages 307-323) and index.

Ethiopia : the Italo-Ethiopian War and reconceptualizing contemporary Africa, 1935-1936 -- In world war and cold war : configuring anticolonialism and internationalism, 1941-1950 -- South Africa : apartheid and nonviolent resistance, 1948-1953 -- Kenya : the Mau Mau and revolutionary violence, 1952-1956 -- Ghana : African independence, 1957-1958 -- The year of Africa : lows, highs, and corners, 1960 -- Congo ; independence, Black nationalism, leftism, and splintering, 1960-1961.

In the mid-20th century nations across Africa fought for their independence from colonial forces. By examining black Americans' attitudes toward and responses to these struggles, this work probes the shifting meaning of Africa in the intellectual, political and social lives of African Americans.

Use copy Restrictions unspecified star MiAaHDL

Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

Description based on print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

For nearly 400 years African people in America have wrestled with the question, "What is Africa to me?" Meriwether's excellent book explores the meaning of Africa to black Americans. Alexander Crummell and Henry McNeal Turner advocated a "return" to Africa, and imagined that African Americans would bring Christianity and civilization to their "backward" brethren. W.E.B. Du Bois embraced a pan-Africanism that regarded African Americans as an advance guard that would play a special role in "saving" Africa. Marcus Garvey envisioned the blacks of the diaspora liberating Africa from colonialism. African Americans were either embarrassed by images of African barbarism, or looked back to the glories of the ancient African past while disparaging contemporary Africa as primitive. African Americans identified more positively with modern Africa when aroused by the Italian invasion of Ethiopia (1935) and by the campaign against apartheid in South Africa in the 1950s. The independence of Ghana (1957) excited a deeper sense of identification with Africa and a new sense of pride and admiration. By 1960, 17 African countries had gained independence. The South African freedom struggle in the 1980s reinforced the sense of solidarity with contemporary Africa. Recommended for all levels and collections. W. Glasker Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Camden

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.