Toward integrated DoD biosurveillance : assessment and opportunities / Melinda Moore, Gail Fisher, Clare Stevens.

By: Moore, Melinda [author.]Contributor(s): Fisher, Gail [author.] | Stevens, Clare [author.] | Arroyo Center [issuing body.] | Rand Corporation [issuing body.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksResearch report (Rand Corporation): RR399.Publisher: Santa Monica, CA : RAND, 2013Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (xxiv, 128 pages) : color illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780833084668 (electronic bk.); 0833084666 (electronic bk.)Report number: RAND RR399Other title: Toward integrated Department of Defense biosurveillance [Other title]Subject(s): Public health surveillance -- United States | Bioterrorism -- United States -- Prevention | Communicable diseases -- United States -- Prevention | United States -- Armed Forces -- Medical care | United States. Department of Defense -- Rules and practice -- EvaluationAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Toward integrated DoD biosurveillance.LOC classification: UG447.8 | .M66 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: Biosurveillance is a cornerstone of public health. In July 2012, the White House issued the National Strategy for Biosurveillance, which defines the term and sets out key functions and guiding principles. The Department of Defense (DoD) carries out biosurveillance to monitor the health of military and affiliated populations and supports biosurveillance in other countries through a range of programs across the department. The Deputy Secretary of Defense issued interim guidance in June 2013 for implementation of the new National Strategy. This begins to set formal policy for DoD's biosurveillance enterprise. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) recognized the importance of effective DoD biosurveillance not only for the department itself but also within the context of the National Strategy. With this in mind, OMB tasked DoD to carry out a comprehensive examination of its biosurveillance enterprise to determine priority missions and desired outcomes, the extent to which DoD biosurveillance programs contribute to these missions, and whether the current funding system is appropriate and how it can be improved to ensure stable funding.
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UG447.8 .K637 2009 Living weapons : UG447.8 .K67 2020 Inside the hot zone : UG447.8 .L45 2012 The Soviet biological weapons program : UG447.8 .M66 2013 Toward integrated DoD biosurveillance : UG447.8 .O93 2014 Barriers to bioweapons : UG447.8 .S583 2014 American biodefense : UG450 .S675 2013 Military Robots and Drones.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 125-128).

Biosurveillance is a cornerstone of public health. In July 2012, the White House issued the National Strategy for Biosurveillance, which defines the term and sets out key functions and guiding principles. The Department of Defense (DoD) carries out biosurveillance to monitor the health of military and affiliated populations and supports biosurveillance in other countries through a range of programs across the department. The Deputy Secretary of Defense issued interim guidance in June 2013 for implementation of the new National Strategy. This begins to set formal policy for DoD's biosurveillance enterprise. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) recognized the importance of effective DoD biosurveillance not only for the department itself but also within the context of the National Strategy. With this in mind, OMB tasked DoD to carry out a comprehensive examination of its biosurveillance enterprise to determine priority missions and desired outcomes, the extent to which DoD biosurveillance programs contribute to these missions, and whether the current funding system is appropriate and how it can be improved to ensure stable funding.

Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (RAND, viewed Dec. 10, 2013).

The research described in this report was sponsored by the United States Army under Contract No. W74V8H-06-C-0001.

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