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Families in crisis in the Old South : divorce, slavery, and the law / Loren Schweninger.

By: Schweninger, Loren.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012Description: 1 online resource (xv, 236 p.) ill.ISBN: 0807837504 (electronic bk.); 9780807837504 (electronic bk.); 9781469601625 (electronic bk.); 1469601621 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Domestic relations -- United States | Divorce -- Law and legislation -- United States | Slavery -- Law and legislation -- United States | Adultery -- United States | Wife abuse -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 306.890975/09034 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The evolution of divorce laws -- Adultery and the question of race -- Insanity, alcoholism, abandonment, and abuse -- Lawyers, judges, juries, and decrees -- Married women and property -- Slaves and owners' domestic conflicts.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
KF505 .S39 2012 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807837504_Schweninger Available ocn811320534

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The evolution of divorce laws -- Adultery and the question of race -- Insanity, alcoholism, abandonment, and abuse -- Lawyers, judges, juries, and decrees -- Married women and property -- Slaves and owners' domestic conflicts.

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CHOICE Review

Schweninger (Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro; coauthor, In Search of the Promised Land: A Slave Family in the Old South, CH, Jul'06, 43-6742) brings attention to the vagaries, heartaches, and sometimes assaults heaped upon antebellum white and slave women--elite and poor--that often led to separation or divorce in the slave South. In destroying mythologies, the author offers fresh perspectives, meticulously researched and documented by court records, of how assertive women using the law, courts, and sometimes state legislatures were able to rid themselves of philandering and abusive husbands. Women too sometimes sought romance outside of marriage; then men sought divorce. Among planters, as one would assume, slaves played a prominent role in family relationships. Women in the quarters were taken advantage of by "Ol' Massah"--or the planter left his wife to live with a slave woman, hence divorce proceedings. Slave men sometimes entered illicit sexual liaisons with "Ol' Miss," leading to separation or divorce. In short, Schweninger masterfully provides readers with an "understanding [of] divorce, alimony, slavery and the law in the Old South." Those with interests in antebellum, women's, or African American history will find this book beneficial. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. D. Travis Texas Woman's University

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