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Takedown : inside the hunt for Al Qaeda / Philip Mudd.

By: Mudd, Philip.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, ©2013Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 200 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780812207880; 0812207882.Subject(s): Intelligence officers -- United States -- Biography | Terrorism -- Government policy -- United States | Terrorism -- United States -- PreventionAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Takedown.DDC classification: 363.325/163092 | B Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
The 9/11 aftermath -- A return to Langley -- The spreading threat: moving beyond the core of the Al Qaeda -- The Second War: the intelligence problem of Iraq -- A new view at CIA: Deputy Director of the counterterrorist center -- The years of threat -- Watching threats at home: the FBI calls -- One more transfer: intelligence at the Department of Homeland Security.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JK468.I6 M83 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt3fhnjb Available ocn859160602

Includes index.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The 9/11 aftermath -- A return to Langley -- The spreading threat: moving beyond the core of the Al Qaeda -- The Second War: the intelligence problem of Iraq -- A new view at CIA: Deputy Director of the counterterrorist center -- The years of threat -- Watching threats at home: the FBI calls -- One more transfer: intelligence at the Department of Homeland Security.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

After the al Qaeda attack on 9/11, a massive reorganization of the nation's security agencies ensued. As a part of this reorganization, there was a major realignment of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). This well-written and engaging book is of interest because, after nearly 20 years of employment in the CIA, Mudd (research fellow, New American Foundation) accepted a major position in the new counterterrorism unit of the FBI. The initial chapters of the book discuss changes within the CIA after 9/11; subsequent chapters discuss the FBI. The reader comes away with an appreciation for the internal cultures of the respective agencies and the magnitude of the effort required to synchronize them. The text of the book conveys the long hours, the uncertainty, and the sheer volume of information that counterterrorism specialists must analyze in each 24-hour briefing cycle. Mudd defends the motivation and the sincerity of those who staff these security agencies, and suggests that the success of the national security reorganization is, in large part, due to the efforts of these dedicated civil servants. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. J. A. Stever emeritus, University of Cincinnati

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Philip Mudd served as Deputy Director of the Counterterrorist Center at the Central Intelligence Agency and later as Deputy Director of the National Security Branch at the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He is an independent consultant and a Research Fellow at the New America Foundation.

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