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Along the streets of Bronzeville : Black Chicago's literary landscape / Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach.

By: Schlabach, Elizabeth Schroeder.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.New Black studies series: Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [2013]Description: 1 online resource (xxii, 167 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780252095108; 0252095103.Subject(s): American literature -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History and criticism | American literature -- African American authors -- History and criticism | African Americans -- Illinois -- Chicago -- Intellectual lifeAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Along the streets of BronzevilleDDC classification: 810.9/977311 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
From black belt to Bronzeville -- The South Side community art center and South Side writers group -- Policy, creativity, and Bronzeville's dreams -- Two Bronzeville autobiographies -- Kitchenettes.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS285.C47 S35 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/j.ctt3fh5vd Available ocn864552272

Includes bibliographical references and index.

From black belt to Bronzeville -- The South Side community art center and South Side writers group -- Policy, creativity, and Bronzeville's dreams -- Two Bronzeville autobiographies -- Kitchenettes.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Many traditional accounts of black literature in the 20th century discuss the Harlem Renaissance era of the 1920s-30s, mention Richard Wright, and then jump to the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s. Following the lead of African American literature scholar Robert Bone, Schlabach (history, Earlham College) seeks to fill in the gap that neglects the Chicago Black Renaissance of the 1930s-40s. She points to the mass migration of blacks from the South to Chicago and the blossoming of music, visual arts, and literature there. The Black Belt of Chicago (Bronzeville to insiders) featured institutions such as the Savoy Ballroom, Regal Theater, and the South Side Community Art Center. The center was dedicated by Eleanor Roosevelt and Alain Locke in 1941. Chicago nurtured the work of Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, Archibald Motley, Margaret Burroughs, and Margaret Walker, among others. Much of their work reflected the impoverished conditions of the segregated inner city and an aesthetic of writing about the experiences of black people from the point of view of black people. In the midst of debasement and suffering, some black artists found and expressed "a grace moving beyond mere survival to [greater] possibility." Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. W. Glasker Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Camden

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach is an associate professor of history and African and African American studies at Earlham College.

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