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In the cause of freedom : radical Black internationalism from Harlem to London, 1917-1939 / Minkah Makalani.

By: Makalani, Minkah.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2011Description: 1 online resource (xviii, 309 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780807869161; 0807869163; 9781469602516; 1469602512.Additional physical formats: Print version:: In the cause of freedom.DDC classification: 323.1196/073 LOC classification: E185.61 | .M23 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Straight socialism or negro-ology? Diaspora, Harlem, and the institutions of Black radicalism -- Liberating Negroes everywhere: Cyril Briggs, the African Blood Brotherhood, and radical pan-africanism -- With all forces menacing empire: Black and Asian radicals internationalize the Third International -- An outcast here as outside: nationality, class, and building racial unity -- An incessant struggle against White supremacy: anticolonial struggles and Black international connections -- The rise of a Black international: George Padmore and the International Trade Union Committee of Negro Workers -- An international African opinion: diasporic London and Black radical intellectual production -- Epilogue: a vitality and validity of its own.
Summary: In this intellectual and social history, Minkah Makalani situates an international network of black radicals and Communists in their various social networks, personal relationships, and organizational activities to demonstrate how radical ideas were produced and how they moved between those engaged in anti-colonial and anti-racist political struggles. In so doing, he demonstrates the emergence of radical black internationalism separately from, and independent of, the white Left.
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E185.61 .M23 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9780807869161_Makalani Available ocn767952993
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E185.61 .L585 2018 Living Legacies : E185.61 .L814 2014 Winning the war for democracy : E185.61 .L85 2014 The Social Gospel in Black and White : E185.61 .M23 2011 In the cause of freedom : E185.61 .M56 2002 Proudly we can be Africans : E185.61 .N4913 2019 The color of the third degree : E185.61 .O29 2010 Climbin' Jacob's ladder :

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Straight socialism or negro-ology? Diaspora, Harlem, and the institutions of Black radicalism -- Liberating Negroes everywhere: Cyril Briggs, the African Blood Brotherhood, and radical pan-africanism -- With all forces menacing empire: Black and Asian radicals internationalize the Third International -- An outcast here as outside: nationality, class, and building racial unity -- An incessant struggle against White supremacy: anticolonial struggles and Black international connections -- The rise of a Black international: George Padmore and the International Trade Union Committee of Negro Workers -- An international African opinion: diasporic London and Black radical intellectual production -- Epilogue: a vitality and validity of its own.

In this intellectual and social history, Minkah Makalani situates an international network of black radicals and Communists in their various social networks, personal relationships, and organizational activities to demonstrate how radical ideas were produced and how they moved between those engaged in anti-colonial and anti-racist political struggles. In so doing, he demonstrates the emergence of radical black internationalism separately from, and independent of, the white Left.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This fine study of black internationalism deals with the years from 1917 to the onset of WW II. Makalani (Texas) covers the Garvey movement, which on occasion viewed the Russian Revolution favorably, and a number of new organizations and leaders. The author also traces relations between such groups and the Communist International. The focus is upon race, colonialism, and class struggle as components of a liberation movement. Among personalities involved, Makalani considers George Padmore, who headed the Comintern's Negro Bureau, to have been central. The broad Sanhedrin All-Race Conference sought to survey the gamut of social, economic, and political interests but ignored labor, peonage, lynching, and the franchise. Makalani observes that this organization exacted an unexpected toll on the radical African Blood Brotherhood (ABB), and its Harlem headquarters ceased to function. Within months, many ABB's activists had joined the Workers Party, contributing to Communist influence among blacks. Makalani makes the point that the New Negro activists fed into civil rights and black power workers, noting a continuum that scholars have too often ignored. Anyone seriously interested in domestic or international aspects of black life has much to gain from a careful reading of Makalani's work. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. H. Shapiro emeritus, University of Cincinnati

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