Forbidden fruit : counterfactuals and international relations / Richard Ned Lebow.

By: Lebow, Richard NedMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, ©2010Description: 1 online resource (x, 335 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781400835126; 1400835127Subject(s): International relations -- Research | World politics -- Research | Cold War | Imaginary histories | Counterfactuals (Logic)Additional physical formats: Print version:: Forbidden fruit.DDC classification: 327.1072 LOC classification: JZ1234 | .L43 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Making sense of the world -- Counterfactual thought experiments -- Franz Ferdinand found alive: World War I unnecessary -- Leadership and the end of the Cold War: did it have to end this way? / coauthored with George W. Breslauer -- Scholars and causation 1 / coauthored with Philip E. Tetlock -- Scholars and causation 2. Experiment 4, instrument 1: unmaking American tragedies -- If Mozart had died at your age: psycho-logic versus statistical inference -- Heil to the chief: Sinclair Lewis, Philip Roth, and fascism.
Summary: Could World War I have been averted if Franz Ferdinand and his wife hadn't been murdered by Serbian nationalists in 1914? What if Ronald Reagan had been killed by Hinckley's bullet? Would the Cold War have ended as it did? In Forbidden Fruit, Richard Ned Lebow develops protocols for conducting robust counterfactual thought experiments and uses them to probe the causes and contingency of transformative international developments like World War I and the end of the Cold War. He uses experiments, surveys, and a short story to explore why policymakers, historians, and international relations schol.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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JZ1234 .L43 2010 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt7t05p Available ocn647874719

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Making sense of the world -- Counterfactual thought experiments -- Franz Ferdinand found alive: World War I unnecessary -- Leadership and the end of the Cold War: did it have to end this way? / coauthored with George W. Breslauer -- Scholars and causation 1 / coauthored with Philip E. Tetlock -- Scholars and causation 2. Experiment 4, instrument 1: unmaking American tragedies -- If Mozart had died at your age: psycho-logic versus statistical inference -- Heil to the chief: Sinclair Lewis, Philip Roth, and fascism.

Could World War I have been averted if Franz Ferdinand and his wife hadn't been murdered by Serbian nationalists in 1914? What if Ronald Reagan had been killed by Hinckley's bullet? Would the Cold War have ended as it did? In Forbidden Fruit, Richard Ned Lebow develops protocols for conducting robust counterfactual thought experiments and uses them to probe the causes and contingency of transformative international developments like World War I and the end of the Cold War. He uses experiments, surveys, and a short story to explore why policymakers, historians, and international relations schol.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Richard Ned Lebow is the James O. Freedman Presidential Professor of Government at Dartmouth College and the Centennial Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His many books include A Cultural Theory of International Relations and We All Lost the Cold War (Princeton).

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